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Distance education methods are useful for delivering education to palliative caregivers: A single-arm trial of an education package (PalliativE Caregivers Education Package)

Overview of attention for article published in Palliative Medicine, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
28 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
16 Mendeley
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Title
Distance education methods are useful for delivering education to palliative caregivers: A single-arm trial of an education package (PalliativE Caregivers Education Package)
Published in
Palliative Medicine, June 2017
DOI 10.1177/0269216317712849
Pubmed ID
Authors

Forbat, Liz, Robinson, Rowena, Bilton-Simek, Rachel, Francois, Karemah, Lewis, Marsha, Haraldsdottir, Erna, Liz Forbat, Rowena Robinson, Rachel Bilton-Simek, Karemah Francois, Marsha Lewis, Erna Haraldsdottir

Abstract

Face-to-face/group education for palliative caregivers is successful, but relies on caregivers travelling, being absent from the patient, and rigid timings. This presents inequities for those in rural locations. To design and test an innovative distance-learning educational package (PrECEPt: PalliativE Caregivers Education Package). Single-arm mixed-method feasibility proof-of-concept trial (ACTRN12616000601437). The primary outcome was carer self-efficacy, with secondary outcomes focused on caregiver preparedness and carer tasks/needs. Analysis focused on three outcome measures (taken at baseline and 6 weeks) and feasibility/acceptability qualitative data. A single specialist palliative care service. Eligible informal caregivers were those of patients registered with the outpatient or community service, where the patient had a prognosis of ⩾12 weeks, supporting someone with nutrition/hydration and/or pain management needs, proficient in English and no major mental health diagnosis. Two modules were developed and tested (nutrition/hydration and pain management) with 18 caregivers. The materials did not have a statistically significant impact on carer self-efficacy. However, statistically significant improvements were observed on the two subsidiary measures of (1) caregiving tasks, consequences and needs ( p = 0.03, confidence interval: 0.72, 9.4) and (2) caregiver preparedness ( p = 0.001, confidence interval: -1.22, -0.46). The study determined that distance learning is acceptable and feasible for both caregivers and healthcare professionals. Distance education improves caregiver preparedness and is a feasible and acceptable approach. A two-arm trial would determine whether the materials benefitted caregivers and patients compared to a control group not receiving the materials. Additional modules could be fruitfully developed and offered.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 28 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 19%
Student > Master 3 19%
Student > Postgraduate 3 19%
Librarian 2 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Other 3 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 4 25%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 19%
Psychology 3 19%
Unspecified 1 6%
Other 1 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 35. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 February 2018.
All research outputs
#382,978
of 12,072,966 outputs
Outputs from Palliative Medicine
#181
of 1,236 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17,714
of 272,276 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Palliative Medicine
#13
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,072,966 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,236 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,276 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.