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Visuotactile integration modulates motor performance in a perceptual decision-making task

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, June 2017
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

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7 X users

Citations

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20 Dimensions

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101 Mendeley
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Title
Visuotactile integration modulates motor performance in a perceptual decision-making task
Published in
Scientific Reports, June 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-03488-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Klaudia Grechuta, Jelena Guga, Giovanni Maffei, Belen Rubio Ballester, Paul F. M. J. Verschure

Abstract

Body ownership is critically dependent on multimodal integration as for instance revealed in the Rubber Hand Illusion (RHI) and a number of studies which have addressed the neural correlates of the processes underlying this phenomenon. Both experimental and clinical research have shown that the structures underlying body ownership seem to significantly overlap with those of motor control including the parietal and ventral premotor cortices, Temporal Parietal Junction (TPJ) and the insula. This raises the question of whether this structural overlap between body ownership and motor control structures is of any functional significance. Here, we investigate the specific question of whether experimentally induced ownership over a virtual limb can modulate the performance of that limb in a simple sensorimotor task. Using a Virtual reality (VR) environment we modulate body ownership in three experimental conditions with respect to the (in)congruence of stimulus configurations. Our results show that the degree of ownership directly modulates motor performance. This implies that body ownership is not exclusively a perceptual and/or subjective multimodal state but that it is tightly coupled to systems for decision-making and motor control.

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X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 101 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 2%
Unknown 99 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 23%
Student > Master 16 16%
Researcher 12 12%
Professor 7 7%
Student > Bachelor 5 5%
Other 13 13%
Unknown 25 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 21 21%
Engineering 16 16%
Neuroscience 15 15%
Computer Science 6 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 4%
Other 12 12%
Unknown 27 27%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 July 2017.
All research outputs
#5,493,099
of 22,979,862 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#37,377
of 124,067 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#87,154
of 317,529 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#1,249
of 4,340 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,979,862 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 124,067 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 317,529 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,340 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.