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Isolation of anti-mycobacterial compounds from Curtisia dentata (Burm.f.) C.A.Sm (Curtisiaceae)

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, June 2017
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Title
Isolation of anti-mycobacterial compounds from Curtisia dentata (Burm.f.) C.A.Sm (Curtisiaceae)
Published in
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12906-017-1818-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Victor O. Fadipe, Nkoana I. Mongalo, Andy R. Opoku, Preachers M. Dikhoba, Tshepiso J. Makhafola

Abstract

Tuberculosis is counted amongst the most infectious and lethal illnesses worldwide and remains one of the major threats to human health. The aim of the current study was to isolate and characterize anti-mycobacterial compounds present in Curtisia dentata (Burm.f.) C.A.Sm , a medicinal plant reportedly used in the treatment of tuberculosis, stomach ailments and sexually transmitted infections. The bioassay guided principle was followed to isolate the anti-mycobacterial compounds. The crude ethanol extracts of the leaves was partitioned with various solvents four compounds such as β-sitosterol, betulinic acid, ursolic acid and lupeol were successfully isolated. The compounds and their derivatives were evaluated for anti-mycobacterial activity using Microplate Alamar Blue Assay (MABA) against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37RV (ATCC 27294). Furthermore, the derivatives were investigated for their toxicity against HepG2 and HEK293 using the MTT assay. The methanol fraction had the lowest minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 22.2 μg/ml against the selected Mycobacterium strain when compared to other fractions. Ursolic acid acetate (UAA) was the most active compound with MIC value of 3.4 μg/ml. The derivatives had varying degrees of toxicity, but were generally non-toxic to the selected cell lines. Derivatives also exhibited highest selectivity index and offers a higher safety margin. The derivatives had better antimicrobial activity and low cytotoxic effects compared to isolated compounds. These increased their selectivity. It appears that acetylation of both betulinic acid and ursolic acid increased their activity against the selected Mycobacterium species. The results obtained in this study gives a clear indication that Curtisia dentata may serve as major source of new alternative medicines that may be used to treat TB. Furthermore, there is a need to explore the activity of these tested plant against other pathogenic Mycobacterium species.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 27%
Unspecified 5 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 17%
Student > Master 4 13%
Other 2 7%
Other 6 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 9 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 13%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 13%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 10%
Other 3 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 June 2017.
All research outputs
#8,748,531
of 11,364,689 outputs
Outputs from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#1,497
of 2,361 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#176,067
of 267,225 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
#19
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,364,689 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,361 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,225 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.