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Teaching Prescribing: Just What the Doctor Ordered? A Thematic Analysis of the Views of Newly Qualified Doctors

Overview of attention for article published in Pharmacy, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#26 of 551)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
19 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
15 Mendeley
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Title
Teaching Prescribing: Just What the Doctor Ordered? A Thematic Analysis of the Views of Newly Qualified Doctors
Published in
Pharmacy, June 2017
DOI 10.3390/pharmacy5020032
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christina Hansen, Elaine Walsh, Colin Bradley, Laura Sahm

Abstract

Undergraduate medical education has been criticised for failing to adequately prepare doctors for the task of prescribing. Pharmacists have been shown to improve medication use in hospitals. This study aims to elicit the views of intern doctors on the challenges of prescribing, and to suggest changes in education to enhance prescribing practice and potential role of the pharmacist. Semi-structured, qualitative interviews were conducted with intern doctors in their first year post qualification in an Irish hospital. Data collection was conducted until no new themes emerged and thematic analysis was performed. Thirteen interviews took place. Interns described training in practical prescribing as limited and felt the curriculum failed to convey the reality of actual prescribing. Pharmacists were perceived to be a useful, but underutilised, information source in the prescribing process. They requested an earlier introduction, and repeated exposure, to prescribing, and suggested the involvement of peers and pharmacists in this teaching. Intern doctors reported difficulties in applying knowledge gained in medical school to clinical practice. New strategies are needed to enhance the clinical relevance of the medical curriculum by rethinking the learning outcomes regarding prescribing practice and the involvement of pharmacists in prescribing education.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 33%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 3 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 40%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 13%
Social Sciences 2 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 7%
Unknown 4 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 June 2017.
All research outputs
#1,789,186
of 18,809,399 outputs
Outputs from Pharmacy
#26
of 551 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#39,378
of 281,330 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Pharmacy
#1
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,809,399 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 551 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,330 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.