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Hemoglobin A1c as screening for gestational diabetes mellitus in Nordic Caucasian women

Overview of attention for article published in Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, July 2016
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Title
Hemoglobin A1c as screening for gestational diabetes mellitus in Nordic Caucasian women
Published in
Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13098-016-0168-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ingrid Hov Odsæter, Arne Åsberg, Eszter Vanky, Siv Mørkved, Signe Nilssen Stafne, Kjell Åsmund Salvesen, Sven Magnus Carlsen

Abstract

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) increases the risk for preeclampsia and macrosomia. GDM is conventionally diagnosed by an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is a marker for the average glucose level the last 2-3 months. We aimed to study if HbA1c alone or in combination with patient characteristics can be used to screen for GDM and reduce the number of OGTTs, and whether it could predict preeclampsia or birth weight. 855 women from a previous study on the effect of exercise on GDM prevalence were eligible, whereof 677 were included. GDM was diagnosed by WHO 1999 criteria (GDM-WHO) and modified IADPSG criteria (GDM-IADPSG), at pregnancy weeks 18-22 and 32-36. HbA1c analyzed at pregnancy weeks 18-22 and 32-36, variables from patient history and clinical examination were considered for logistic regression models. The diagnostic accuracy was assessed by ROC curve analysis. Accumulated GDM prevalence was 6.7 % by WHO and 7.2 % by modified IADPSG criteria. Nearly a third could potentially have avoided an OGTT by using HbA1c to exclude GDM-IADPSG with a sensitivity of 88 % at week 18-22 and 97 % at week 32-36. Further, 16 % could have avoided an OGTT with a sensitivity of 96 % using HbA1c at week 18-22 to exclude GDM-IADPSG throughout pregnancy. HbA1c was not accurate at diagnosing GDM-IADPSG, and it was inaccurate at screening for GDM-WHO at any time point. Adding other predictors did not increase the number of potentially avoidable OGTTs significantly. HbA1c was not significantly associated with preeclampsia or birth weight. HbA1c could potentially reduce the number of OGTTs.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 39 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 12 31%
Student > Postgraduate 6 15%
Other 3 8%
Researcher 3 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 8%
Other 5 13%
Unknown 7 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 51%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 8 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 June 2017.
All research outputs
#10,068,574
of 11,352,109 outputs
Outputs from Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome
#290
of 338 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#203,063
of 242,112 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome
#19
of 19 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,352,109 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 338 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 242,112 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 19 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.