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How Should Integrity Preservation and Professional Growth Be Balanced during Trainees' Professionalization?

Overview of attention for article published in AMA Journal of Ethics, June 2017
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28 tweeters
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3 Facebook pages

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7 Mendeley
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Title
How Should Integrity Preservation and Professional Growth Be Balanced during Trainees' Professionalization?
Published in
AMA Journal of Ethics, June 2017
DOI 10.1001/journalofethics.2017.19.6.ecas2-1706
Pubmed ID
Abstract

People can experience moral distress when they regard themselves as expected to pursue a course of action they believe to be morally wrong. However, beliefs that give rise to moral distress are sometimes underdeveloped. Experiences of moral distress are not uncommon for medical trainees, who are still in the process of forming their professional identities and whose identity-constituting beliefs might therefore be subject to ongoing revision. Thus, it is important for health professions training programs to incorporate case-based ethics education sessions into their structure to help identify and alleviate trainees' moral distress, provide ethics education, and create a "safe space" for trainees to talk openly about moral concerns related to clinical practice. Such opportunities are crucial to the professional growth of trainees.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 28 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 2 29%
Student > Bachelor 1 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 14%
Librarian 1 14%
Student > Postgraduate 1 14%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 2 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 29%
Psychology 1 14%
Unknown 2 29%