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Protected areas as social-ecological systems: perspectives from resilience and social-ecological systems theory

Overview of attention for article published in Ecological Applications, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
42 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
88 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
304 Mendeley
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Title
Protected areas as social-ecological systems: perspectives from resilience and social-ecological systems theory
Published in
Ecological Applications, August 2017
DOI 10.1002/eap.1584
Pubmed ID
Authors

Graeme S. Cumming, Craig R. Allen

Abstract

Conservation biology and applied ecology increasingly recognise that natural resource management is both an outcome and a driver of social, economic, and ecological dynamics. Protected areas offer a fundamental approach to conserving ecosystems, but they are also social-ecological systems whose ecological management and sustainability are heavily influenced by people. This editorial, and the papers in the invited feature that it introduces, discuss three emerging themes in social-ecological systems approaches to understanding protected areas: (1) the resilience and sustainability of protected areas, including analyses of their internal dynamics, their effectiveness, and the resilience of the landscapes within which they occur; (2) the relevance of spatial context and scale for protected areas, including such factors as geographic connectivity, context, exchanges between protected areas and their surrounding landscapes, and scale dependency in the provision of ecosystem services; and (3) efforts to re-frame what protected areas are and how they both define and are defined by the relationships of people and nature. These emerging themes have the potential to transform management and policy approaches for protected areas and have important implications for conservation, in both theory and practice. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 42 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 304 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Sweden 1 <1%
Unknown 303 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 64 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 56 18%
Researcher 34 11%
Student > Bachelor 24 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 19 6%
Other 52 17%
Unknown 55 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 99 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 56 18%
Social Sciences 29 10%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 12 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 8 3%
Other 30 10%
Unknown 70 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 24. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 October 2019.
All research outputs
#1,322,217
of 22,385,407 outputs
Outputs from Ecological Applications
#365
of 3,143 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#27,531
of 295,041 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecological Applications
#8
of 37 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,385,407 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,143 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 295,041 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 37 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.