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Emerging fungal pathogen Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola in wild European snakes

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (96th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
106 tweeters
facebook
12 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
reddit
2 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
40 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
109 Mendeley
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Title
Emerging fungal pathogen Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola in wild European snakes
Published in
Scientific Reports, June 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-03352-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lydia H. V. Franklinos, Jeffrey M. Lorch, Elizabeth Bohuski, Julia Rodriguez-Ramos Fernandez, Owen N. Wright, Liam Fitzpatrick, Silviu Petrovan, Chris Durrant, Chris Linton, Vojtech Baláž, Andrew A. Cunningham, Becki Lawson

Abstract

Snake fungal disease (SFD) is an emerging disease of conservation concern in eastern North America. Ophidiomyces ophiodiicola, the causative agent of SFD, has been isolated from over 30 species of wild snakes from six families in North America. Whilst O. ophiodiicola has been isolated from captive snakes outside North America, the pathogen has not been reported from wild snakes elsewhere. We screened 33 carcasses and 303 moulted skins from wild snakes collected from 2010-2016 in Great Britain and the Czech Republic for the presence of macroscopic skin lesions and O. ophiodiicola. The fungus was detected using real-time PCR in 26 (8.6%) specimens across the period of collection. Follow up culture and histopathologic analyses confirmed that both O. ophiodiicola and SFD occur in wild European snakes. Although skin lesions were mild in most cases, in some snakes they were severe and were considered likely to have contributed to mortality. Culture characterisations demonstrated that European isolates grew more slowly than those from the United States, and phylogenetic analyses indicated that isolates from European wild snakes reside in a clade distinct from the North American isolates examined. These genetic and phenotypic differences indicate that the European isolates represent novel strains of O. ophiodiicola. Further work is required to understand the individual and population level impact of this pathogen in Europe.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 106 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 109 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 109 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 17%
Student > Bachelor 18 17%
Researcher 17 16%
Student > Master 17 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 6%
Other 12 11%
Unknown 19 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 47 43%
Environmental Science 14 13%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 8 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 2%
Other 5 5%
Unknown 26 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 131. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 June 2021.
All research outputs
#202,528
of 19,178,874 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#2,394
of 103,085 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,748
of 279,824 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#20
of 510 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,178,874 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 103,085 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,824 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 510 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.