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Mild reproductive effects of the Tityus bahiensis scorpion venom in rats

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases, January 2014
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35 Mendeley
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Title
Mild reproductive effects of the Tityus bahiensis scorpion venom in rats
Published in
Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases, January 2014
DOI 10.1186/1678-9199-20-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ana Leticia C Dorce, Valquiria AC Dorce, Ana Leonor A Nencioni

Abstract

Scorpion envenoming is a public health problem in Brazil, where Tityus serrulatus and T. bahiensis are considered the most dangerous scorpions. They are well adapted to urbanized environments, and there is an increasing probability of human exposure to these venoms, including during pregnancy. Not much is known about the effects of prenatal exposure to the venom, and no information is available to aid in the rational treatment of victims stung during pregnancy. Thus, this study aimed to investigate whether venom from the scorpion T. bahiensis administered once to pregnant female rats at a dose that causes a moderate envenomation may lead to deleterious effects on the reproductive performance of the dams and on the development of their offspring. This is the first work demonstrating that T. bahiensis venom, when administered experimentally to rats, alters maternal reproductive performance and the morphological development of fetuses. The venom was given to dams on the 5th (GD5) or on the 10th (GD10) gestational day. After laparotomy, on GD21, fetuses and placentas were counted, weighed and externally analyzed. The corpora lutea were counted. The sex and vitality of fetuses were evaluated, and each litter was then randomly divided for visceral or skeletal analyses. Data were analyzed by ANOVA followed by the Tukey-Kramer test and Fisher's exact test. The significance level for all tests was set at p < 0.05.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 3%
Unknown 34 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 17%
Professor 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Student > Master 3 9%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 8 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 26%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 4 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Computer Science 2 6%
Other 6 17%
Unknown 8 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 February 2014.
All research outputs
#3,351,164
of 5,037,615 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases
#140
of 215 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,308
of 143,438 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins including Tropical Diseases
#3
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,037,615 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 215 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.8. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 143,438 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 6 of them.