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MSM HIV testing following an online testing intervention in China

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, June 2017
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1 tweeter

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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47 Mendeley
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Title
MSM HIV testing following an online testing intervention in China
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2546-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ngai Sze Wong, Weiming Tang, Larry Han, John Best, Ye Zhang, Shujie Huang, Heping Zheng, Bin Yang, Chongyi Wei, Stephen W. Pan, Joseph D. Tucker

Abstract

Scaling up HIV testing is the first step in the HIV treatment continuum which is important for controlling the HIV epidemic among men who have sex with men (MSM). Following an online HIV testing intervention among MSM, we aim to examine sociodemographic and spatial factors associated with HIV testing. We conducted a secondary analysis on data from an online HIV testing intervention among MSM who had never-tested for HIV. The survey was distributed through online networks connected to all provinces and regions of China. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed to examine factors associated with testing three weeks post-intervention. At three weeks after the intervention, 36% of 624 followed-up MSM underwent HIV testing, 69 men reported positive HIV test results. Having money for sex, ever tested for sexually transmitted infections and intimate partner violence experience were significant factors of post-intervention HIV testing. Students were less likely to undergo HIV testing at follow-up compared to others (adjusted odds ratio=0.69, 95% C.I.=0.47-0.99), adjusted by age and type of intervention. Moderate provincial spatial variation of testing was observed. While high risk men generally had higher HIV testing rates, some MSM like students had lower testing rates, suggesting the need for further ways to enhance HIV testing in specific MSM communities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 13 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 13%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Other 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Other 4 9%
Unknown 11 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 10 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 17%
Social Sciences 7 15%
Arts and Humanities 3 6%
Psychology 2 4%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 15 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 June 2017.
All research outputs
#7,093,680
of 11,389,380 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#2,360
of 4,231 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#149,396
of 263,417 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#56
of 109 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,389,380 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,231 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,417 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 109 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.