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Hybridization among Arctic white-headed gulls (Larusspp.) obscures the genetic legacy of the Pleistocene

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology and Evolution, May 2012
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

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blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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11 Dimensions

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39 Mendeley
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Title
Hybridization among Arctic white-headed gulls (Larusspp.) obscures the genetic legacy of the Pleistocene
Published in
Ecology and Evolution, May 2012
DOI 10.1002/ece3.240
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah A. Sonsthagen, R. Terry Chesser, Douglas A. Bell, Carla J. Dove

Abstract

We studied the influence of glacial oscillations on the genetic structure of seven species of white-headed gull that breed at high latitudes (Larus argentatus, L. canus, L. glaucescens, L. glaucoides, L. hyperboreus, L. schistisagus, and L. thayeri). We evaluated localities hypothesized as ice-free areas or glacial refugia in other Arctic vertebrates using molecular data from 11 microsatellite loci, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region, and six nuclear introns for 32 populations across the Holarctic. Moderate levels of genetic structure were observed for microsatellites (F(ST)= 0.129), introns (Φ(ST)= 0.185), and mtDNA control region (Φ(ST)= 0.461), with among-group variation maximized when populations were grouped based on subspecific classification. Two haplotype and at least two allele groups were observed across all loci. However, no haplotype/allele group was composed solely of individuals of a single species, a pattern consistent with recent divergence. Furthermore, northernmost populations were not well differentiated and among-group variation was maximized when L. argentatus and L. hyberboreus populations were grouped by locality rather than species, indicating recent hybridization. Four populations are located in putative Pleistocene glacial refugia and had larger τ estimates than the other 28 populations. However, we were unable to substantiate these putative refugia using coalescent theory, as all populations had genetic signatures of stability based on mtDNA. The extent of haplotype and allele sharing among Arctic white-headed gull species is noteworthy. Studies of other Arctic taxa have generally revealed species-specific clusters as well as genetic structure within species, usually correlated with geography. Aspects of white-headed gull behavioral biology, such as colonization ability and propensity to hybridize, as well as their recent evolutionary history, have likely played a large role in the limited genetic structure observed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 39 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 3%
Spain 1 3%
Unknown 37 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 38%
Researcher 6 15%
Student > Master 3 8%
Other 3 8%
Student > Bachelor 2 5%
Other 6 15%
Unknown 4 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 64%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Computer Science 1 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 7 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 June 2015.
All research outputs
#1,297,334
of 13,156,706 outputs
Outputs from Ecology and Evolution
#698
of 3,822 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,654
of 186,265 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology and Evolution
#10
of 61 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,156,706 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,822 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 186,265 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 61 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.