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Relationship between nasopharyngeal and bronchoalveolar microbial communities in clinically healthy feedlot cattle

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters

Citations

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19 Dimensions

Readers on

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37 Mendeley
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Title
Relationship between nasopharyngeal and bronchoalveolar microbial communities in clinically healthy feedlot cattle
Published in
BMC Microbiology, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12866-017-1042-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mohamed M. Zeineldin, James F. Lowe, Elsbeth D. Grimmer, Maria R. C. de Godoy, Mohamed M. Ghanem, Yassein M. Abd El-Raof, Brian M. Aldridge

Abstract

The importance of upper airway structure in the susceptibility of the lower respiratory tract to colonization with potential pathogens is well established. With the advent of rapid, high throughput, next generation sequencing, there is a growing appreciation of the importance of commensal microbial populations in maintaining mucosal health, and a realization that bacteria colonize anatomical locations that were previously considered to be sterile. While upper respiratory tract microbial populations have been described, there are currently no published studies describing the normal microbial populations of the bovine lower respiratory tract. Consequently, we have little understanding of the relationship between upper and lower respiratory tract microbiota in healthy cattle. The primary objective of our study was to characterize the composition, structure and relationship of the lower and upper respiratory microbial communities in clinically healthy feedlot cattle. Nasopharyngeal swabs (NPS), and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, were collected from clinically healthy feedlot calves (n = 8). Genomic DNA from each sample was extracted, and the V3-V4 hypervariable region of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene was amplified and sequenced using Illumina Miseq platform. Across all samples, the most predominant phyla were Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. The most common genera were Rathayibacter, Mycoplasma, Bibersteinia and Corynebacterium. The microbial community structure was distinct between these two biogeographical sites. Most of the bacterial genera identified in the BAL samples were also present in the NPS, but biogeographical-specific genera were enriched in both the NPS (Rathayibacter) and BAL (Bibersteinia) samples. There were strong associations between the presence of certain taxa at each specific location, and strong correlations between the presence of specific taxa in both the NPS and BAL samples. The correlation between the presence of specific taxa in both the NPS and BAL samples, supports the notion of a mutualistic interrelationship between these microbial communities. Future studies, in large cohorts of animals, are needed to determine the role and clinical importance of the relationships of respiratory tract microbial communities with health, productivity, and susceptibility to the development of respiratory disease, in growing cattle.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 16%
Student > Master 5 14%
Other 3 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 8%
Other 6 16%
Unknown 7 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 27%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 8 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 9 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 June 2017.
All research outputs
#5,823,562
of 11,410,025 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#592
of 1,608 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#99,002
of 263,005 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#11
of 54 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,410,025 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,608 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,005 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 54 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.