↓ Skip to main content

Detection and genetic characterization of Seoul Virus from commensal brown rats in France

Overview of attention for article published in Virology Journal, January 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (64th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
24 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
58 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Detection and genetic characterization of Seoul Virus from commensal brown rats in France
Published in
Virology Journal, January 2014
DOI 10.1186/1743-422x-11-32
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tatiana Dupinay, Kieran C Pounder, Florence Ayral, Maria-Halima Laaberki, Denise A Marston, Sandra Lacôte, Catherine Rey, Fabienne Barbet, Katja Voller, Nicolas Nazaret, Marc Artois, Philippe Marianneau, Joel Lachuer, Anthony R Fooks, Michel Pépin, Catherine Legras-Lachuer, Lorraine M McElhinney

Abstract

Hantaviruses are single-stranded RNA viruses, which are transmitted to humans primarily via inhalation of aerosolised virus in contaminated rodent urine and faeces. Whilst infected reservoir hosts are asymptomatic, human infections can lead to two clinical manifestations, haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS), with varying degrees of clinical severity. The incidence of rodent and human cases of Seoul virus (SEOV) in Europe has been considered to be low, and speculated to be driven by the sporadic introduction of infected brown rats (Rattus norvegicus) via ports.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 58 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 14 24%
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 19%
Student > Master 6 10%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Other 11 19%
Unknown 7 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 43%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 9%
Engineering 2 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 3%
Other 6 10%
Unknown 13 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 February 2014.
All research outputs
#6,347,047
of 12,515,237 outputs
Outputs from Virology Journal
#708
of 2,099 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#66,010
of 186,928 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Virology Journal
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,515,237 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,099 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 186,928 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.