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Affimer proteins are versatile and renewable affinity reagents

Overview of attention for article published in eLife, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
twitter
79 X users
patent
4 patents
facebook
9 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
159 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
331 Mendeley
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Title
Affimer proteins are versatile and renewable affinity reagents
Published in
eLife, June 2017
DOI 10.7554/elife.24903
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christian Tiede, Robert Bedford, Sophie J Heseltine, Gina Smith, Imeshi Wijetunga, Rebecca Ross, Danah AlQallaf, Ashley PE Roberts, Alexander Balls, Alistair Curd, Ruth E Hughes, Heather Martin, Sarah R Needham, Laura C Zanetti-Domingues, Yashar Sadigh, Thomas P Peacock, Anna A Tang, Naomi Gibson, Hannah Kyle, Geoffrey W Platt, Nicola Ingram, Thomas Taylor, Louise P Coletta, Iain Manfield, Margaret Knowles, Sandra Bell, Filomena Esteves, Azhar Maqbool, Raj K Prasad, Mark Drinkhill, Robin S Bon, Vikesh Patel, Sarah A Goodchild, Marisa Martin-Fernandez, Ray J Owens, Joanne E Nettleship, Michael E Webb, Michael Harrison, Jonathan D Lippiat, Sreenivasan Ponnambalam, Michelle Peckham, Alastair Smith, Paul Ko Ferrigno, Matt Johnson, Michael J McPherson, Darren Charles Tomlinson

Abstract

Molecular recognition reagents are key tools for understanding biological processes and are used universally by scientists to study protein expression, localisation and interactions. Antibodies remain the most widely used of such reagents and many show excellent performance, although some are poorly characterised or have stability or batch variability issues, supporting the use of alternative binding proteins as complementary reagents for many applications. Here we report on the use of Affimer proteins as research reagents. We selected 12 diverse molecular targets for Affimer selection to exemplify their use in common molecular and cellular applications including the (a) selection against various target molecules; (b) modulation of protein function in vitro and in vivo; (c) labelling of tumour antigens in mouse models; and (d) use in affinity fluorescence and super-resolution microscopy. This work shows that Affimer proteins, as is the case for other alternative binding scaffolds, represent complementary affinity reagents to antibodies for various molecular and cell biology applications.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 79 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 331 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 331 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 72 22%
Researcher 48 15%
Student > Bachelor 48 15%
Student > Master 25 8%
Other 15 5%
Other 47 14%
Unknown 76 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 94 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 51 15%
Chemistry 28 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 10 3%
Other 46 14%
Unknown 87 26%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 103. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 April 2023.
All research outputs
#421,719
of 25,870,142 outputs
Outputs from eLife
#1,190
of 15,913 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,782
of 333,080 outputs
Outputs of similar age from eLife
#32
of 365 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,870,142 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 15,913 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 35.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 333,080 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 365 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.