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Plant diversity increases with the strength of negative density dependence at the global scale

Overview of attention for article published in Science, June 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
policy
1 policy source
twitter
115 tweeters
facebook
4 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
151 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
437 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Plant diversity increases with the strength of negative density dependence at the global scale
Published in
Science, June 2017
DOI 10.1126/science.aam5678
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joseph A. LaManna, Scott A. Mangan, Alfonso Alonso, Norman A. Bourg, Warren Y. Brockelman, Sarayudh Bunyavejchewin, Li-Wan Chang, Jyh-Min Chiang, George B. Chuyong, Keith Clay, Richard Condit, Susan Cordell, Stuart J. Davies, Tucker J. Furniss, Christian P. Giardina, I. A. U. Nimal Gunatilleke, C. V. Savitri Gunatilleke, Fangliang He, Robert W. Howe, Stephen P. Hubbell, Chang-Fu Hsieh, Faith M. Inman-Narahari, David Janík, Daniel J. Johnson, David Kenfack, Lisa Korte, Kamil Král, Andrew J. Larson, James A. Lutz, Sean M. McMahon, William J. McShea, Hervé R. Memiaghe, Anuttara Nathalang, Vojtech Novotny, Perry S. Ong, David A. Orwig, Rebecca Ostertag, Geoffrey G. Parker, Richard P. Phillips, Lawren Sack, I-Fang Sun, J. Sebastián Tello, Duncan W. Thomas, Benjamin L. Turner, Dilys M. Vela Díaz, Tomáš Vrška, George D. Weiblen, Amy Wolf, Sandra Yap, Jonathan A. Myers

Abstract

Theory predicts that higher biodiversity in the tropics is maintained by specialized interactions among plants and their natural enemies that result in conspecific negative density dependence (CNDD). By using more than 3000 species and nearly 2.4 million trees across 24 forest plots worldwide, we show that global patterns in tree species diversity reflect not only stronger CNDD at tropical versus temperate latitudes but also a latitudinal shift in the relationship between CNDD and species abundance. CNDD was stronger for rare species at tropical versus temperate latitudes, potentially causing the persistence of greater numbers of rare species in the tropics. Our study reveals fundamental differences in the nature of local-scale biotic interactions that contribute to the maintenance of species diversity across temperate and tropical communities.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 115 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 437 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Japan 2 <1%
Chile 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 432 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 102 23%
Researcher 95 22%
Student > Master 47 11%
Student > Bachelor 41 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 26 6%
Other 67 15%
Unknown 59 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 206 47%
Environmental Science 107 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 3%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 10 2%
Arts and Humanities 5 1%
Other 15 3%
Unknown 82 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 142. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 October 2018.
All research outputs
#186,246
of 19,294,245 outputs
Outputs from Science
#6,173
of 74,075 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,252
of 279,749 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science
#174
of 1,001 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,294,245 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 74,075 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 57.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,749 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,001 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.