↓ Skip to main content

A multicentre double-blind randomised controlled trial evaluating the efficacy of daily use of antibacterial mouthwash against oropharyngeal gonorrhoea among men who have sex with men: the OMEGA (Oral…

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Infectious Diseases, June 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
19 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
29 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
49 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
A multicentre double-blind randomised controlled trial evaluating the efficacy of daily use of antibacterial mouthwash against oropharyngeal gonorrhoea among men who have sex with men: the OMEGA (Oral Mouthwash use to Eradicate GonorrhoeA) study protocol
Published in
BMC Infectious Diseases, June 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12879-017-2541-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eric P. F. Chow, Sandra Walker, Jane S. Hocking, Catriona S. Bradshaw, Marcus Y. Chen, Sepehr N. Tabrizi, Benjamin P. Howden, Matthew G. Law, Kate Maddaford, Tim R. H. Read, David A. Lewis, David M. Whiley, Lei Zhang, Andrew E. Grulich, John M. Kaldor, Vincent J. Cornelisse, Samuel Phillips, Basil Donovan, Anna M. McNulty, David J. Templeton, Norman Roth, Richard Moore, Christopher K. Fairley

Abstract

Gonorrhoea is one of the most common sexually transmissible infections in men who have sex with men (MSM). Gonorrhoea rates have increased substantially in recent years. There is concern that increasing gonorrhoea prevalence will increase the likelihood of worsening antibiotic resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae. A recent randomised controlled trial (RCT) demonstrated that a single-dose of mouthwash has an inhibitory effect against oropharyngeal gonorrhoea. We are conducting the first RCT to evaluate whether daily use of mouthwash could reduce the risk of acquiring oropharyngeal gonorrhoea. The OMEGA (Oral Mouthwash use to Eradicate GonorrhoeA) study is a double-blind RCT and will be conducted at several sexual health clinics and high caseload General Practice (GP) clinics in Melbourne and Sydney, Australia. A total of 504 MSM attending the participating sites will be recruited. Participants will be randomised to either using 'Study mouthwash A' or 'Study mouthwash B' for 12 weeks. Study mouthwash A was inhibitory against N. gonorrhoeae in vitro, whereas study mouthwash B was not. Participants will be instructed to rinse and gargle the study mouthwash for 60 seconds every day. The primary outcome is the proportion of participants with oropharyngeal gonorrhoea detected by nucleic acid amplification test by 12 weeks. The results from this trial may provide a novel way to reduce gonorrhoea prevalence and transmission without the use of antibiotics that may be associated with development of resistance. If shown to be effective, the widespread use of mouthwash will reduce the prevalence of oropharyngeal gonorrhoea, which plays key role in driving the emergence of gonococcal antimicrobial resistance through DNA exchange with oral commensal bacteria. The anticipated net effect will be interruption of onward transmission of N. gonorrhoeae within high density sexual networks within MSM populations. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12616000247471 , registered on 23rd February 2016.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 49 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 20%
Student > Master 7 14%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 10%
Other 4 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 13 27%
Unknown 7 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 47%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 6%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 4%
Unspecified 1 2%
Other 7 14%
Unknown 9 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 October 2019.
All research outputs
#1,398,923
of 14,735,459 outputs
Outputs from BMC Infectious Diseases
#403
of 5,497 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#39,321
of 264,751 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Infectious Diseases
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,735,459 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,497 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,751 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them