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Overexpression of c-Met in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells improves their effectiveness in homing and repair of acute liver failure

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, July 2017
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Title
Overexpression of c-Met in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells improves their effectiveness in homing and repair of acute liver failure
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13287-017-0614-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kun Wang, Yuwen Li, Tiantian Zhu, Yongting Zhang, Wenting Li, Wenyu Lin, Jun Li, Chuanlong Zhu, Kun Wang, Yuwen Li, Tiantian Zhu, Yongting Zhang, Wenting Li, Wenyu Lin, Jun Li, Chuanlong Zhu

Abstract

Transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) has emerged as a novel therapy for acute liver failure (ALF). However, the homing efficiency of BMSCs to the injured liver sites appears to be poor. In this study, we aimed to determine if overexpression of c-Met in BMSCs could promote the homing ability of BMSCs to rat livers affected by ALF. Overexpression of c-Met in BMSCs (c-Met-BMSCs) was attained by transfection of naive BMSCs with the lenti-c-Met-GFP. The impact of transplanted c-Met-BMSCs on both homing and repair of ALF was evaluated and compared with lenti-GFP empty vector transfected BMSCs (control BMSCs). After cells were transfected with the lenti-c-Met-GFP vector, the BMSCs displayed very high expression of c-Met protein as demonstrated by Western blot. In addition, in vitro transwell migration assays showed that the migration ability of c-Met-BMSCs was significantly increased in comparison with that of control BMSCs (P < 0.05), and was dependent on hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Furthermore, rats with ALF that received transplanted c-Met-BMSCs showed significantly improved homing ability to the injured liver; this was accompanied by elevated survival rates and liver function in the ALF rats. Parallel pathological examination further confirmed that transplantation of c-Met-BMSCs ameliorated liver injury with reduced hepatic activity index (HAI) scores, and that the effects of c-Met-BMSCs were more profound than those of control BMSCs. Overexpression of c-Met promotes the homing of BMSCs to injured hepatic sites in a rat model of ALF, thereby improving the efficacy of BMSC therapy for ALF repair.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 4 27%
Student > Master 3 20%
Student > Postgraduate 2 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 13%
Professor > Associate Professor 1 7%
Other 1 7%
Unknown 2 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 47%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 27%
Physics and Astronomy 1 7%
Engineering 1 7%
Unknown 2 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 July 2017.
All research outputs
#9,154,284
of 11,435,137 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#690
of 919 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#189,102
of 259,699 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#41
of 55 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,435,137 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 919 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,699 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 55 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.