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Drug Shortages: A Complex Health Care Crisis

Overview of attention for article published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, March 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#23 of 3,451)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
63 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
15 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
105 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
146 Mendeley
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Title
Drug Shortages: A Complex Health Care Crisis
Published in
Mayo Clinic Proceedings, March 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.mayocp.2013.11.014
Pubmed ID
Authors

Erin R. Fox, Burgunda V. Sweet, Valerie Jensen

Abstract

National tracking of drug shortages began in 2001. However, a significant increase in the number of shortages began in late 2009, with numbers reaching what many have termed crisis level. The typical drug in short supply is a generic product administered by injection. Common classes of drugs affected by shortages include anesthesia medications, antibiotics, pain medications, nutrition and electrolyte products, and chemotherapy agents. The economic and clinical effects of drug shortages are significant. The financial effect of drug shortages is estimated to be hundreds of millions of dollars annually for health systems across the United States. Clinically, patients have been harmed by the lack of drugs or inferior alternatives, resulting in more than 15 documented deaths. Drug shortages occur for a variety of reasons. Generic injectable drugs are particularly susceptible to drug shortages because there are few manufacturers of these products and all manufacturers are running at full capacity. In addition, some manufacturers have had production problems, resulting in poor quality product. Although many suppliers are working to upgrade facilities and add additional manufacturing lines, these activities take time. A number of stakeholder organizations have been involved in meetings to further determine the causes and effects of drug shortages. A new law was enacted in July 2012 that granted the Food and Drug Administration additional tools to address the drug shortage crisis. The future of drug shortages is unknown, but there are hopeful indications that quality improvements and additional capacity may decrease the number of drug shortages in the years to come.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 146 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 1%
Unknown 144 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 30 21%
Student > Bachelor 27 18%
Researcher 18 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 12%
Other 12 8%
Other 24 16%
Unknown 17 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 33 23%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 32 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 5%
Social Sciences 8 5%
Engineering 8 5%
Other 34 23%
Unknown 23 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 538. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 March 2020.
All research outputs
#17,227
of 14,723,957 outputs
Outputs from Mayo Clinic Proceedings
#23
of 3,451 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#209
of 188,226 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Mayo Clinic Proceedings
#1
of 54 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,723,957 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,451 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 188,226 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 54 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.