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Recommended dietary intakes for vitamin D: where do they come from, what do they achieve and how can we meet them?

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Human Nutrition & Dietetics, March 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (79th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
68 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
106 Mendeley
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Title
Recommended dietary intakes for vitamin D: where do they come from, what do they achieve and how can we meet them?
Published in
Journal of Human Nutrition & Dietetics, March 2014
DOI 10.1111/jhn.12226
Pubmed ID
Authors

K. D. Cashman, M. Kiely

Abstract

There is substantial evidence that the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency is high across Europe, particularly, but not exclusively, among those resident at Northerly latitudes. This has significant implications for human health throughout the lifecycle and impacts upon healthy growth and development and successful ageing for current and possibly future generations. In recent years, there have been several important reports from North America and Europe in relation to dietary reference values (DRVs) for vitamin D. These may be of enormous value from a public health perspective in terms of preventing vitamin D deficiency and promoting adequate vitamin D status in the population. In this concise review, we provide a brief summary of current DRVs for vitamin D, their background and their application to vitamin D deficiency prevention. The review also provides some brief guidance with respect to applying the DRVs in a clinical nutrition setting. In addition, the review illustrates how current dietary intakes of most populations, young and adult, are well short of the newly established DRVs. Accordingly, the review highlights potential food-based or dietary strategies for increasing the distribution of vitamin D intake in the population with the aim of preventing vitamin D deficiency. Finally, despite the explosion in scientific research in vitamin D and health, there are many fundamental gaps in the field of vitamin D from the public health perspective. The impact of these knowledge gaps on current DRVs for vitamin D is highlighted, as are some future developments that may help address these gaps.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 106 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 106 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 26%
Student > Bachelor 21 20%
Researcher 10 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 8%
Other 8 8%
Other 19 18%
Unknown 11 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 25 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 7%
Social Sciences 5 5%
Other 12 11%
Unknown 17 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 January 2016.
All research outputs
#3,741,631
of 18,796,528 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Human Nutrition & Dietetics
#409
of 1,201 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#40,911
of 197,563 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Human Nutrition & Dietetics
#11
of 59 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,796,528 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,201 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 197,563 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 59 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.