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Attenuation of eph receptor kinase activation in cancer cells by coexpressed ephrin ligands.

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, December 2013
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Title
Attenuation of eph receptor kinase activation in cancer cells by coexpressed ephrin ligands.
Published in
PLoS ONE, December 2013
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0081445
Pubmed ID
Authors

Giulia Falivelli, Erika Mathes Lisabeth, Elena Rubio de la Torre, Gizeh Perez-Tenorio, Giovanna Tosato, Ombretta Salvucci, Elena B. Pasquale, Falivelli G, Lisabeth EM, Rubio de la Torre E, Perez-Tenorio G, Tosato G, Salvucci O, Pasquale EB

Abstract

The Eph receptor tyrosine kinases mediate juxtacrine signals by interacting "in trans" with ligands anchored to the surface of neighboring cells via a GPI-anchor (ephrin-As) or a transmembrane segment (ephrin-Bs), which leads to receptor clustering and increased kinase activity. Additionally, soluble forms of the ephrin-A ligands released from the cell surface by matrix metalloproteases can also activate EphA receptor signaling. Besides these trans interactions, recent studies have revealed that Eph receptors and ephrins coexpressed in neurons can also engage in lateral "cis" associations that attenuate receptor activation by ephrins in trans with critical functional consequences. Despite the importance of the Eph/ephrin system in tumorigenesis, Eph receptor-ephrin cis interactions have not been previously investigated in cancer cells. Here we show that in cancer cells, coexpressed ephrin-A3 can inhibit the ability of EphA2 and EphA3 to bind ephrins in trans and become activated, while ephrin-B2 can inhibit not only EphB4 but also EphA3. The cis inhibition of EphA3 by ephrin-B2 implies that in some cases ephrins that cannot activate a particular Eph receptor in trans can nevertheless inhibit its signaling ability through cis association. We also found that an EphA3 mutation identified in lung cancer enhances cis interaction with ephrin-A3. These results suggest a novel mechanism that may contribute to cancer pathogenesis by attenuating the tumor suppressing effects of Eph receptor signaling pathways activated by ephrins in trans.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 1 3%
United Kingdom 1 3%
Unknown 29 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 35%
Researcher 5 16%
Student > Bachelor 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 13%
Student > Master 3 10%
Other 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 71%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 10%
Unspecified 1 3%
Neuroscience 1 3%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 January 2014.
All research outputs
#2,015,792
of 3,629,816 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#35,500
of 64,079 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#49,380
of 95,480 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#2,898
of 4,715 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,629,816 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 64,079 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.3. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 95,480 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,715 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.