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Effects of host species and environment on the skin microbiome of Plethodontid salamanders

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Animal Ecology, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
27 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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68 Dimensions

Readers on

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135 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of host species and environment on the skin microbiome of Plethodontid salamanders
Published in
Journal of Animal Ecology, August 2017
DOI 10.1111/1365-2656.12726
Pubmed ID
Authors

Carly R. Muletz Wolz, Stephanie A. Yarwood, Evan H. Campbell Grant, Robert C. Fleischer, Karen R. Lips

Abstract

1.The amphibian skin microbiome is recognized for its role in defense against pathogens, including the deadly fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Yet, we have little understanding of evolutionary and ecological processes that structure these communities, especially for salamanders and closely related species. We investigated patterns in the distribution of bacterial communities on Plethodon salamander skin across host species and environments. 2.Quantifying salamander skin microbiome structure contributes to our understanding of how host-associated bacteria are distributed across the landscape, among host species, and their putative relationship with disease. 3.We characterized skin microbiome structure (alpha-diversity, beta-diversity and bacterial operational taxonomic unit [OTU] abundances) using 16S rRNA gene sequencing for co-occurring Plethodon salamander species (35 P. cinereus, 17 P. glutinosus, 10 P. cylindraceus) at three localities to differentiate the effects of host species from environmental factors on the microbiome. We sampled the microbiome of P. cinereus along an elevational gradient (n = 50, 700 - 1000 masl) at one locality to determine whether elevation predicts microbiome structure. Finally, we quantified prevalence and abundance of putatively anti-Bd bacteria to determine if Bd-inhibitory bacteria are dominant microbiome members. 4.Co-occurring salamanders had similar microbiome structure, but among sites salamanders had dissimilar microbiome structure for beta-diversity and abundance of 28 bacterial OTUs. We found that alpha-diversity increased with elevation, beta-diversity and the abundance of 17 bacterial OTUs changed with elevation (16 OTUs decreasing, 1 OTU increasing). We detected 11 putatively anti-Bd bacterial OTUs that were present on 90% of salamanders and made up an average relative abundance of 83% (SD ± 8.5) per salamander. All salamanders tested negative for Bd. 5.We conclude that environment is more influential in shaping skin microbiome structure than host differences for these congeneric species, and suggest that environmental characteristics that co-vary with elevation influence microbiome structure. High prevalence and abundance of anti-Bd bacteria may contribute to low Bd levels in these populations of Plethodon salamanders. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 27 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 135 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 135 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 39 29%
Researcher 21 16%
Student > Bachelor 17 13%
Student > Master 16 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 6%
Other 19 14%
Unknown 15 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 61 45%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 19 14%
Environmental Science 11 8%
Immunology and Microbiology 7 5%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 2%
Other 9 7%
Unknown 25 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 29. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 June 2022.
All research outputs
#1,044,482
of 21,429,365 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Animal Ecology
#341
of 2,893 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,980
of 283,739 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Animal Ecology
#7
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,429,365 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,893 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,739 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.