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Who Decides: Me or We? Family Involvement in Medical Decision Making in Eastern and Western Countries

Overview of attention for article published in Medical Decision Making, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
14 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
59 Mendeley
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Title
Who Decides: Me or We? Family Involvement in Medical Decision Making in Eastern and Western Countries
Published in
Medical Decision Making, July 2017
DOI 10.1177/0272989x17715628
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dana L. Alden, John Friend, Ping Yein Lee, Yew Kong Lee, Lyndal Trevena, Chirk Jenn Ng, Sorapop Kiatpongsan, Khatijah Lim Abdullah, Miho Tanaka, Supanida Limpongsanurak

Abstract

Research suggests that desired family involvement (FI) in medical decision making may depend on cultural values. Unfortunately, the field lacks cross-cultural studies that test this assumption. As a result, providers may be guided by incomplete information or cultural biases rather than patient preferences. Researchers developed 6 culturally relevant disease scenarios varying from low to high medical seriousness. Quota samples of approximately 290 middle-aged urban residents in Australia, China, Malaysia, India, South Korea, Thailand, and the USA completed an online survey that examined desired levels of FI and identified individual difference predictors in each country. All reliability coefficients were acceptable. Regression models met standard assumptions. The strongest finding across all 7 countries was that those who desired higher self-involvement (SI) in medical decision making also wanted lower FI. On the other hand, respondents who valued relational-interdependence tended to want their families involved - a key finding in 5 of 7 countries. In addition, in 4 of 7 countries, respondents who valued social hierarchy desired higher FI. Other antecedents were less consistent. These results suggest that it is important for health providers to avoid East-West cultural stereotypes. There are meaningful numbers of patients in all 7 countries who want to be individually involved and those individuals tend to prefer lower FI. On the other hand, more interdependent patients are likely to want families involved in many of the countries studied. Thus, individual differences within culture appear to be important in predicting whether a patient desires FI. For this reason, avoiding culture-based assumptions about desired FI during medical decision making is central to providing more effective patient centered care.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 59 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 14%
Student > Master 8 14%
Researcher 7 12%
Other 6 10%
Student > Bachelor 5 8%
Other 17 29%
Unknown 8 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 15%
Psychology 6 10%
Social Sciences 4 7%
Unspecified 3 5%
Other 8 14%
Unknown 14 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 January 2018.
All research outputs
#2,067,015
of 13,602,602 outputs
Outputs from Medical Decision Making
#209
of 993 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#55,503
of 262,326 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Medical Decision Making
#7
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,602,602 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 993 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,326 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.