↓ Skip to main content

Predicting Magnetostimulation Thresholds in the Peripheral Nervous System using Realistic Body Models

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, July 2017
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
65 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Predicting Magnetostimulation Thresholds in the Peripheral Nervous System using Realistic Body Models
Published in
Scientific Reports, July 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-05493-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mathias Davids, Bastien Guérin, Matthias Malzacher, Lothar R. Schad, Lawrence L. Wald

Abstract

Rapid switching of applied magnetic fields in the kilohertz frequency range in the human body induces electric fields powerful enough to cause Peripheral Nerve Stimulation (PNS). PNS has become one of the main constraints on the use of high gradient fields for fast imaging with the latest MRI gradient technology. In recent MRI gradients, the applied fields are powerful enough that PNS limits their application in fast imaging sequences like echo-planar imaging. Application of Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) to humans is similarly PNS constrained. Despite its role as a major constraint, PNS considerations are only indirectly incorporated in the coil design process, mainly through using the size of the linear region as a proxy for PNS thresholds or by conducting human experiments after constructing coil prototypes. We present for the first time, a framework to simulate PNS thresholds for realistic coil geometries to directly address PNS in the design process. Our PNS model consists of an accurate body model for electromagnetic field simulations, an atlas of peripheral nerves, and a neurodynamic model to predict the nerve responses to imposed electric fields. With this model, we were able to reproduce measured PNS thresholds of two leg/arm solenoid coils with good agreement.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 65 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 65 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 15 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 18%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Student > Master 6 9%
Lecturer 3 5%
Other 14 22%
Unknown 9 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 26 40%
Physics and Astronomy 10 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 9%
Neuroscience 5 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 3%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 13 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 July 2017.
All research outputs
#10,172,540
of 11,465,445 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#40,736
of 49,545 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#217,164
of 258,263 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#3,328
of 4,051 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,465,445 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 49,545 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.2. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,263 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4,051 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.