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Tracking development assistance and government health expenditures for 35 malaria-eliminating countries: 1990–2017

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#22 of 4,521)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
11 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
19 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
34 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
40 Mendeley
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Title
Tracking development assistance and government health expenditures for 35 malaria-eliminating countries: 1990–2017
Published in
Malaria Journal, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12936-017-1890-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rima Shretta, Brittany Zelman, Maxwell L. Birger, Annie Haakenstad, Lavanya Singh, Yingying Liu, Joseph Dieleman

Abstract

Donor financing for malaria has declined since 2010 and this trend is projected to continue for the foreseeable future. These reductions have a significant impact on lower burden countries actively pursuing elimination, which are usually a lesser priority for donors. While domestic spending on malaria has been growing, it varies substantially in speed and magnitude across countries. A clear understanding of spending patterns and trends in donor and domestic financing is needed to uncover critical investment gaps and opportunities. Building on the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation's annual Financing Global Health research, data were collected from organizations that channel development assistance for health to the 35 countries actively pursuing malaria elimination. Where possible, development assistance for health (DAH) was categorized by spend on malaria intervention. A diverse set of data points were used to estimate government health budgets expenditure on malaria, including World Malaria Reports and government reports when available. Projections were done using regression analyses taking recipient country averages and earmarked funding into account. Since 2010, DAH for malaria has been declining for the 35 countries actively pursuing malaria elimination (from $176 million in 2010 to $62 million in 2013). The Global Fund is the largest external financier for malaria, providing 96% of the total external funding for malaria in 2013, with vector control interventions being the highest cost driver in all regions. Government expenditure on malaria, while increasing, has not kept pace with diminishing DAH or rising national GDP rates, leading to a potential gap in service delivery needed to attain elimination. Despite past gains, total financing available for malaria in elimination settings is declining. Health financing trends suggest that substantive policy interventions will be needed to ensure that malaria elimination is adequately financed and that available financing is effectively targeted to interventions that provide the best value for money.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 40 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 40 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 28%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 20%
Researcher 7 18%
Lecturer 4 10%
Other 2 5%
Other 4 10%
Unknown 4 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 30%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 18%
Social Sciences 4 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 8%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 5%
Other 8 20%
Unknown 4 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 102. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 October 2017.
All research outputs
#214,210
of 16,035,941 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#22
of 4,521 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,349
of 267,850 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,035,941 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,521 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,850 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them