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Tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis (TINU) syndrome: a systematic review of its epidemiology, demographics and risk factors

Overview of attention for article published in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, July 2017
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7 tweeters

Citations

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34 Dimensions

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60 Mendeley
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Title
Tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis (TINU) syndrome: a systematic review of its epidemiology, demographics and risk factors
Published in
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13023-017-0677-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Linda O. Okafor, Peter Hewins, Philip I. Murray, Alastair K. Denniston

Abstract

Tubulointerstitial nephritis and uveitis (TINU) syndrome is a rare oculorenal inflammatory condition that was first described in 1975. In 2001 a major review identified 133 cases in the world literature and proposed key diagnostic criteria for the condition. Although acknowledged as rare, the limited data available prevented reliable estimates of the prevalence of the condition, and hampered elucidation of the relationship between genetic and environmental factors that contribute to its pathogenesis.In this review we have performed a systematic search on the epidemiology, demographics and proposed risk factors for TINU. Estimates of prevalence based on studies that explicitly report TINU cases suggest that it is diagnosed in 0.2-2% of patients attending specialist uveitis services, with variation reflecting a number of factors including level of diagnostic certainty required. The prevalence of uveitis in patients with tubulointerstitial nephritis (TIN) may be higher than currently recognised, particularly in the paediatric population.The prevalence of TINU is higher in younger age groups and there is a female preponderance although this gender effect appears weaker than suggested by early studies. Although important genetic contributions have been proposed, the small size of studies and variation between reports currently preclude identification of a 'pro-TINU' haplotype. Drugs and infections have been proposed as the leading acquired risk factors for the development of TINU; whilst the small size of TINU cohorts and issues of study design limit interpretation of many studies. Larger datasets from the renal literature suggest that the majority of these cases are precipitated by a drug-induced hypersensitivity reaction; however in many ophthalmic cases no clear precipitant is identified.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 60 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 10 17%
Student > Bachelor 9 15%
Other 5 8%
Student > Postgraduate 5 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 8%
Other 10 17%
Unknown 16 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 33 55%
Psychology 2 3%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 2%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 19 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 February 2022.
All research outputs
#6,532,578
of 21,744,520 outputs
Outputs from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#907
of 2,464 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#97,753
of 283,394 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#2
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,744,520 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,464 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,394 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.