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Barriers and facilitators to adherence to secondary stroke prevention medications after stroke: analysis of survivors and caregivers views from an online stroke forum

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Open, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
16 news outlets
twitter
25 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
42 Mendeley
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Title
Barriers and facilitators to adherence to secondary stroke prevention medications after stroke: analysis of survivors and caregivers views from an online stroke forum
Published in
BMJ Open, July 2017
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2017-016814
Pubmed ID
Authors

James Jamison, Stephen Sutton, Jonathan Mant, Anna De Simoni

Abstract

To identify barriers and facilitators of medication adherence in patients with stroke along with their caregivers. Qualitative thematic analysis of posts about secondary prevention medications, informed by Perceptions and Practicalities Approach. Posts written by the UK stroke survivors and their family members taking part in the online forum of the Stroke Association, between 2004 and 2011. 84 participants: 49 stroke survivors, 33 caregivers, 2 not stated, identified using the keywords 'taking medication', 'pills', 'size', 'side-effects', 'routine', 'blister' as well as secondary prevention medication terms. Perceptions reducing the motivation to adhere included dealing with medication side effects, questioning doctors' prescribing practices and negative publicity about medications, especially in regard to statins. Caregivers faced difficulties with ensuring medications were taken while respecting the patient's decisions not to take tablets. They struggled in their role as advocates of patient's needs with healthcare professionals. Not experiencing side effects, attributing importance to medications, positive personal experiences of taking tablets and obtaining modification of treatment to manage side effects were facilitators of adherence. Key practical barriers included difficulties with swallowing tablets, dealing with the burden of treatment and drug cost. Using medication storage devices, following routines and getting help with medications from caregivers were important facilitators of adherence. An online stroke forum is a novel and valuable resource to investigate use of secondary prevention medications. Analysis of this forum highlighted significant barriers and facilitators of medication adherence faced by stroke survivors and their caregivers. Addressing perceptual and practical barriers highlighted here can inform the development of future interventions aimed at improving adherence to secondary prevention medication after stroke.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 25 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 42 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 42 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 10 24%
Student > Master 9 21%
Student > Bachelor 5 12%
Student > Postgraduate 3 7%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 3 7%
Other 12 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 10 24%
Unspecified 10 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 17%
Social Sciences 5 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 12%
Other 5 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 141. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 October 2018.
All research outputs
#105,677
of 13,595,754 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Open
#235
of 12,115 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,176
of 213,493 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Open
#6
of 399 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,595,754 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,115 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 213,493 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 399 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.