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From Agricultural Intensification to Conservation: Sediment Transport in the Raccoon River, Iowa, 1916–2009

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Environmental Quality, January 2011
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#8 of 154)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog

Citations

dimensions_citation
18 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
11 Mendeley
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Title
From Agricultural Intensification to Conservation: Sediment Transport in the Raccoon River, Iowa, 1916–2009
Published in
Journal of Environmental Quality, January 2011
DOI 10.2134/jeq2010.0507
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christopher S. Jones, Keith E. Schilling

Abstract

Fluvial sediment is a ubiquitous pollutant that negatively affects surface water quality and municipal water supply treatment. As part of its routine water supply monitoring, the Des Moines Water Works (DMWW) has been measuring turbidity daily in the Raccoon River since 1916. For this study, we calibrated daily turbidity readings to modern total suspended solid (TSS) concentrations to develop an estimation of daily sediment concentrations in the river from 1916 to 2009. Our objectives were to evaluate long-term TSS patterns and trends, and relate these to changes in climate, land use, and agricultural practices that occurred during the 93-yr monitoring period. Results showed that while TSS concentrations and estimated sediment loads varied greatly from year to year, TSS concentrations were much greater in the early 20th century despite drier conditions and less discharge, and declined throughout the century. Against a backdrop of increasing discharge in the Raccoon River and widespread agricultural adaptations by farmers, sediment loads increased and peaked in the early 1970s, and then have slowly declined or remained steady throughout the 1980s to present. With annual sediment load concentrated during extreme events in the spring and early summer, continued sediment reductions in the Raccoon River watershed should be focused on conservation practices to reduce rainfall impacts and sediment mobilization. Overall, results from this study suggest that efforts to reduce sediment load from the watershed appear to be working.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 27%
Professor 2 18%
Researcher 2 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 18%
Student > Bachelor 1 9%
Other 1 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 36%
Environmental Science 3 27%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 18%
Unspecified 1 9%
Engineering 1 9%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 March 2014.
All research outputs
#328,993
of 3,628,445 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Environmental Quality
#8
of 154 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,220
of 93,606 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Environmental Quality
#1
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 3,628,445 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 154 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 93,606 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them