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Oil exposure disrupts early life-history stages of coral reef fishes via behavioural impairments

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Ecology & Evolution, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Citations

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mendeley
52 Mendeley
Title
Oil exposure disrupts early life-history stages of coral reef fishes via behavioural impairments
Published in
Nature Ecology & Evolution, July 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41559-017-0232-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jacob L. Johansen, Bridie J. M. Allan, Jodie L. Rummer, Andrew J. Esbaugh

Abstract

Global demand for energy and oil-based products is progressively introducing petrogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) into sensitive marine environments, primarily from fossil-fuel exploration, transport, and urban and industrial runoff. These toxic pollutants are found worldwide, yet the long-term ecological effects on coral reef ecosystems are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that oil exposure spanning PAH concentrations that are environmentally relevant for many coastal marine ecosystems (≤5.7 μg l(-1)), including parts of the Great Barrier Reef, Red Sea, Asia and the Caribbean, causes elevated mortality and stunted growth rates in six species of pre-settlement coral reef fishes, spanning two evolutionarily distinct families (Pomacentridae and Lethrinidae). Furthermore, oil exposure alters habitat settlement and antipredator behaviours, causing reduced sheltering, shoaling and increased risk taking, all of which exacerbate predator-induced mortality during recruitment. These results suggest a previously unknown path, whereby oil and PAH exposure impair higher-order cognitive processing and behaviours necessary for the successful settlement and survival of larval fishes. This emphasizes the risks associated with industrial activities within at-risk ecosystems.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 61 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 52 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 52 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 25%
Researcher 9 17%
Student > Master 8 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 12%
Unspecified 5 10%
Other 11 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 42%
Environmental Science 13 25%
Unspecified 7 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 6%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 4%
Other 5 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 225. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 May 2019.
All research outputs
#55,716
of 13,366,062 outputs
Outputs from Nature Ecology & Evolution
#142
of 893 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,364
of 215,254 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Ecology & Evolution
#12
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,366,062 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 893 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 148.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 215,254 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.