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Drugs for preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting

Overview of attention for article published in Cochrane database of systematic reviews, July 2017
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Title
Drugs for preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting
Published in
Cochrane database of systematic reviews, July 2017
DOI 10.1002/14651858.cd004125.pub3
Pubmed ID
Authors

John Carlisle, Carl A Stevenson

Abstract

Drugs can prevent postoperative nausea and vomiting, but their relative efficacies and side effects have not been compared within one systematic review. The objective of this review was to assess the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting by drugs and the development of any side effects. We searched The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 2, 2004), MEDLINE (January 1966 to May 2004), EMBASE (January 1985 to May 2004), CINAHL (1982 to May 2004), AMED (1985 to May 2004), SIGLE (to May 2004), ISI WOS (to May 2004), LILAC (to May 2004) and INGENTA bibliographies. We included randomized controlled trials that compared a drug with placebo or another drug, or compared doses or timing of administration, that reported postoperative nausea or vomiting as an outcome. Two authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted outcome data. We included 737 studies involving 103,237 people. Compared to placebo, eight drugs prevented postoperative nausea and vomiting: droperidol, metoclopramide, ondansetron, tropisetron, dolasetron, dexamethasone, cyclizine and granisetron. Publication bias makes evidence for differences among these drugs unreliable. The relative risks (RR) versus placebo varied between 0.60 and 0.80, depending upon the drug and outcome. Evidence for side effects was sparse: droperidol was sedative (RR 1.32) and headache was more common after ondansetron (RR 1.16). Either nausea or vomiting is reported to affect, at most, 80 out of 100 people after surgery. If all 100 of these people are given one of the listed drugs, about 28 would benefit and 72 would not. Nausea and vomiting are usually less common and, therefore, drugs are less useful. For 100 people, of whom 30 would vomit or feel sick after surgery if given placebo, 10 people would benefit from a drug and 90 would not. Between one to five patients out of every 100 people may experience a mild side effect, such as sedation or headache, when given an antiemetic drug. Collaborative research should focus on determining whether antiemetic drugs cause more severe, probably rare, side effects. Further comparison of the antiemetic effect of one drug versus another is not a research priority.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 80 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 1%
Australia 1 1%
Unknown 78 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 15 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 16%
Researcher 9 11%
Student > Bachelor 8 10%
Other 8 10%
Other 19 24%
Unknown 8 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 57 71%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 5%
Unspecified 1 1%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 1%
Other 4 5%
Unknown 7 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 July 2017.
All research outputs
#10,024,129
of 12,527,219 outputs
Outputs from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#9,059
of 9,882 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#191,178
of 260,809 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cochrane database of systematic reviews
#181
of 199 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,527,219 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,882 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.5. This one is in the 3rd percentile – i.e., 3% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 199 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 3rd percentile – i.e., 3% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.