Widespread rapid reductions in body size of adult salamanders in response to climate change

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, March 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 2,334)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
25 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
61 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Readers on

mendeley
182 Mendeley
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Title
Widespread rapid reductions in body size of adult salamanders in response to climate change
Published in
Global Change Biology, March 2014
DOI 10.1111/gcb.12550
Pubmed ID
Authors

Caruso, Nicholas M., Sears, Michael W., Adams, Dean C., Lips, Karen R., Caruso NM, Sears MW, Adams DC, Lips KR

Abstract

Reduction in body size is a major response to climate change, yet evidence in globally imperiled amphibians is lacking. Shifts in average population body size could indicate either plasticity in the growth response to changing climates through changes in allocation and energetics, or through selection for decreased size where energy is limiting. We compared historic and contemporary size measurements in 15 Plethodon species from 102 populations (9450 individuals) and found that six species exhibited significant reductions in body size over 55 years. Biophysical models, accounting for actual changes in moisture and air temperature over that period, showed a 7.1-7.9% increase in metabolic expenditure at three latitudes but showed no change in annual duration of activity. Reduced size was greatest at southern latitudes in regions experiencing the greatest drying and warming. Our results are consistent with a plastic response of body size to climate change through reductions in body size as mediated through increased metabolism. These rapid reductions in body size over the past few decades have significance for the susceptibility of amphibians to environmental change, and relevance for whether adaptation can keep pace with climate change in the future.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 61 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 182 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 12 7%
Germany 3 2%
Brazil 3 2%
France 2 1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Unknown 159 87%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 65 36%
Researcher 34 19%
Student > Master 23 13%
Student > Bachelor 20 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 6%
Other 29 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 140 77%
Environmental Science 34 19%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 1%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 <1%
Other 2 1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 299. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 December 2015.
All research outputs
#16,029
of 7,476,496 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#4
of 2,334 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#447
of 172,634 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#1
of 77 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,476,496 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,334 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 172,634 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 77 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.