↓ Skip to main content

Swedish-Norwegian co-operation in the treatment of three hypothermia victims: a case report

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, July 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#46 of 884)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
42 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
23 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Swedish-Norwegian co-operation in the treatment of three hypothermia victims: a case report
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13049-017-0418-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anders Wetting Carlsen, Nils K. Skjaervold, Nils Johan Berg, Øystein Karlsen, Eli Gunnarson, Alexander Wahba

Abstract

Accidental hypothermia with cardiac arrest represents a challenge for pre-hospital rescuers as well as in-hospital staff. For pre-hospital personnel, the main focus is to get the patient to the correct destination without unnecessary delay. For in-hospital personnel early information is vital to assess the possibility for resuscitation with extracorporeal re-warming. The challenge is augmented when rescuers must cross national borders to reach and/or deliver the patients. We present a case where three adolescent boys suffered severe hypothermia after a canoeing accident in Sweden. Three 14-year-old boys were canoeing a mountain lake close to the Norwegian border when their boat capsized and they all fell into the cold water. The rescue operation was hampered by rough weather conditions, and immersion times spanned from 63 to 125 min. Flight times from the scene of accident to the nearest ECMO center in Norway (Trondheim) and Sweden (Umeå) were about 30 and 90 min respectively. Two of the victims showed no vital signs after retrieval from the water and had extremely low body temperatures. They were brought to Trondheim University Hospital where they were resuscitated successfully with extracorporeal re-warming. Unable to be weaned from ECMO in the initial phase, both patients were retrieved by mobile ECMO teams to Karolinska University Hospital, from where they were discharged to their homes with good outcomes, although with some sequelae. A third victim with moderate to severe hypothermia without cardiac arrest was treated at a local hospital, from where he after a short stay was discharged without physical sequelae. These cases are a reminder of the traditional mantra that «no one is dead until warm and dead». Good communication between pre- and in-hospital staff can be vital for optimizing patient treatment when handling victims of severe hypothermia, and especially when there is multiple victims. Communication between neighboring countries, but even neighboring regions within the same country, can be challenging. We encourage regions similar to ours to review protocols regarding hypothermia management, making them more robust before incidents like this take place.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 42 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 23 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 23 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 6 26%
Student > Master 6 26%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 9%
Student > Bachelor 2 9%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 1 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 61%
Social Sciences 2 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 4%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 1 4%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 31. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 October 2019.
All research outputs
#588,579
of 14,124,214 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#46
of 884 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#20,384
of 264,788 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,124,214 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 884 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,788 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them