↓ Skip to main content

Effects of air pollution caused by sugarcane burning in Western São Paulo on the cardiovascular system

Overview of attention for article published in Revista de Saúde Pública, March 2017
Altmetric Badge

Readers on

mendeley
47 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Effects of air pollution caused by sugarcane burning in Western São Paulo on the cardiovascular system
Published in
Revista de Saúde Pública, March 2017
DOI 10.1590/s1518-8787.2017051006495
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pestana, Paula Roberta da Silva, Braga, Alfésio Luís Ferreira, Ramos, Ercy Mara Cipulo, Oliveira, Ariadna Ferraz de, Osadnik, Christian Robert, Ferreira, Aline Duarte, Ramos, Dionei, Pestana, Paula Roberta da Silva, Braga, Alfésio Luís Ferreira, Ramos, Ercy Mara Cipulo, Oliveira, Ariadna Ferraz de, Osadnik, Christian Robert, Ferreira, Aline Duarte, Ramos, Dionei

Abstract

To evaluate the effects of acute exposure to air pollutants (NO2 and PM10) on hospitalization of adults and older people with cardiovascular diseases in Western São Paulo. Daily cardiovascular-related hospitalization data (CID10 - I00 to I99) were acquired by the Department of Informatics of the Brazilian Unified Health System (DATASUS) from January 2009 to December 2012. Daily levels of NO2 and PM10 and weather data were obtained from Companhia Ambiental do Estado de São Paulo (CETESB - São Paulo State Environmental Agency). To estimate the effects of air pollutants exposure on hospital admissions, generalized linear Poisson regression models were used. During the study period, 6,363 hospitalizations were analysed. On the day of NO2 exposure, an increase of 1.12% (95%CI 0.05-2.20) was observed in the interquartile range along with an increase in hospital admissions. For PM10, a pattern of similar effect was observed; however, results were not statistically significant. Even though with values within established limits, NO2 is an important short-term risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 47 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 8 17%
Student > Master 7 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Student > Postgraduate 3 6%
Student > Bachelor 3 6%
Other 8 17%
Unknown 14 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 19%
Environmental Science 8 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 13%
Chemistry 2 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 2%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 14 30%