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Exposure to Farm Animals and Risk of Lung Cancer in the AGRICAN Cohort

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Epidemiology, July 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (72nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (61st percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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11 Mendeley
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Title
Exposure to Farm Animals and Risk of Lung Cancer in the AGRICAN Cohort
Published in
American Journal of Epidemiology, July 2017
DOI 10.1093/aje/kwx125
Pubmed ID
Authors

Séverine Tual, Clémentine Lemarchand, Mathilde Boulanger, Jean-Charles Dalphin, Bernard Rachet, Elisabeth Marcotullio, Michel Velten, Anne-Valérie Guizard, Bénédicte Clin, Isabelle Baldi, Pierre Lebailly

Abstract

Epidemiologic studies have found lower risks of lung cancer in farmers. However, little is known about the types of agricultural activities concerned. In the Agriculture and Cancer cohort, we assessed the relationship between animal farming and lung cancer by investigating the types of animals, tasks, and timing of exposure. Analyses included 170,834 participants from the Agriculture and Cancer (AGRICAN) cohort in France. Incident lung cancers were identified through linkage with cancer registries from enrollment (2005-2007) to 2011. A Cox model, adjusting for pack-years of cigarette smoking, was used to calculate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Lung cancer risk was inversely related to duration of exposure to cattle (≥40 years: hazard ratio = 0.60, 95% confidence interval: 0.41, 0.89; P for trend < 0.01) and to horse farming (≥20 years: hazard ratio = 0.64, 95% confidence interval: 0.35, 1.17; P for trend = 0.09), especially for adenocarcinomas, but not with poultry or pig farming. More pronounced decreased risks were reported among individuals who had cared for animals, undertaken milking, and who had been exposed to cattle in infancy. Our study provides strong evidence of an inverse association between lung cancer and cattle and horse farming. Further research is warranted to identify the etiologic protective agents and biological mechanisms.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor 2 18%
Researcher 2 18%
Student > Master 2 18%
Unspecified 2 18%
Student > Bachelor 1 9%
Other 2 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 3 27%
Unspecified 2 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 9%
Environmental Science 1 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 9%
Other 3 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 April 2019.
All research outputs
#3,154,452
of 13,668,760 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Epidemiology
#2,992
of 7,530 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,044
of 264,864 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Epidemiology
#28
of 72 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,668,760 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 76th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,530 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,864 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 72% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 72 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.