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Predictors and Moderators of Outcome for Severe and Enduring Anorexia Nervosa

Overview of attention for article published in Behaviour Research & Therapy, May 2014
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

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7 tweeters

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69 Mendeley
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Title
Predictors and Moderators of Outcome for Severe and Enduring Anorexia Nervosa
Published in
Behaviour Research & Therapy, May 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.brat.2014.03.006
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel Le Grange, Ellen E. Fitzsimmons-Craft, Ross D. Crosby, Phillipa Hay, Hubert Lacey, Bryony Bamford, Colleen Stiles-Shields, Stephen Touyz

Abstract

Few of the limited randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for adults with anorexia nervosa (AN) have explored predictors and moderators of outcome. This study aimed to identify predictors and moderators of outcome at end of treatment (EOT) and 6- and 12-month follow-up for adults with AN (N = 63). All participants met criteria for severe and enduring AN (duration of illness ≥ 7 years) and participated in an RCT of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT-AN) and specialist supportive clinical management (SSCM). General linear models were utilized and included all available outcome data at all time points. Outcome was assessed across three domains: eating disorder quality of life (EDQOL), mental health (MCS), and depressive symptoms (BDI). Predictors of better outcome included: lower age, shorter duration of illness, having AN-R, being employed, not taking psychotropic medication, and better social adjustment. Four moderators of treatment outcome emerged: eating disorder psychopathology (EDE Global), depression (BDI), age, and AN subtype. Participants with higher baseline scores on these measures, older age, or binge eating/purging subtype benefited more from CBT-AN than SSCM. Older patients with more severe eating-related psychopathology and depression have better outcomes in a behaviorally targeted treatment such as CBT-AN rather than a supportive treatment such as SSCM.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 69 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 67 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 20%
Student > Bachelor 11 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 13%
Researcher 7 10%
Other 19 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 39 57%
Medicine and Dentistry 19 28%
Environmental Science 2 3%
Unspecified 2 3%
Social Sciences 2 3%
Other 5 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 August 2014.
All research outputs
#850,764
of 5,036,026 outputs
Outputs from Behaviour Research & Therapy
#289
of 978 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#24,424
of 123,701 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Behaviour Research & Therapy
#5
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 5,036,026 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 978 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 123,701 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.