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Blood transfusion in elderly patients with chronic anemia: a qualitative analysis of the general practitioners’ attitudes

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Family Practice, July 2017
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25 Mendeley
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Title
Blood transfusion in elderly patients with chronic anemia: a qualitative analysis of the general practitioners’ attitudes
Published in
BMC Family Practice, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12875-017-0647-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sylvain Le Calvé, Dominique Somme, Joaquim Prud’homm, Aline Corvol

Abstract

Blood transfusion in chronic anemia is not covered by guidelines specific to older adults. When they consider that this treatment is necessary in elderly patients, French general practitioners (GPs) contact a hospital specialist to plan a transfusion. Twenty French GPs were questioned individually regarding their approach to blood transfusion using semi-structured interviews. Each interview was recorded, typed up verbatim and then coded using an inductive procedure by theme, in a cross-over design (two researchers) in two phases: analysis and summary, followed by grouping of the recorded comments. The criteria for transfusion were hemoglobin level < 8 g/dL and cardiac comorbidities. Some geriatric issues, such as cognitive disorder or dependence, were considered, either as aspects of frailty favoring transfusion or as markers of reduced life expectancy that limit care. Falls and fear of an unpleasant death from anemia prompted GPs to order blood transfusion. The patient's family provided guidance, but the patient was not routinely consulted. The specialists were rarely asked to participate in decision making. GPs' perceptions were ambivalent: they considered transfusion to be extraordinary and magical, but also pointless since its effects are transient. The decision to give a transfusion to an elderly patient with chronic anemia is deemed complex, but GPs seem to take it alone, sometimes guided by the patient's family. The drawing up of an advance care plan could help involve the patient in decision making.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 5 20%
Student > Master 4 16%
Researcher 3 12%
Lecturer 2 8%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 6 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 36%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 4%
Unspecified 1 4%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 7 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 July 2017.
All research outputs
#10,204,177
of 11,500,624 outputs
Outputs from BMC Family Practice
#1,034
of 1,138 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#221,298
of 262,458 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Family Practice
#10
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,500,624 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,138 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,458 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
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