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Estimating the burden of foodborne diseases in Japan

Overview of attention for article published in Bulletin of the World Health Organization, June 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (59th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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29 Dimensions

Readers on

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147 Mendeley
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Title
Estimating the burden of foodborne diseases in Japan
Published in
Bulletin of the World Health Organization, June 2015
DOI 10.2471/blt.14.148056
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yuko Kumagai, Stuart Gilmour, Erika Ota, Yoshika Momose, Toshiro Onishi, Ver Luanni Feliciano Bilano, Fumiko Kasuga, Tsutomu Sekizaki, Kenji Shibuya

Abstract

To assess the burden posed by foodborne diseases in Japan using methods developed by the World Health Organization's Foodborne Disease Burden Epidemiology Reference Group (FERG). Expert consultation and statistics on food poisoning during 2011 were used to identify three common causes of foodborne disease in Japan: Campylobacter and Salmonella species and enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC). We conducted systematic reviews of English and Japanese literature on the complications caused by these pathogens, by searching Embase, the Japan medical society abstract database and Medline. We estimated the annual incidence of acute gastroenteritis from reported surveillance data, based on estimated probabilities that an affected person would visit a physician and have gastroenteritis confirmed. We then calculated disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) lost in 2011, using the incidence estimates along with disability weights derived from published studies. In 2011, foodborne disease caused by Campylobacter species, Salmonella species and EHEC led to an estimated loss of 6099, 3145 and 463 DALYs in Japan, respectively. These estimated burdens are based on the pyramid reconstruction method; are largely due to morbidity rather than mortality; and are much higher than those indicated by routine surveillance data. Routine surveillance data may indicate foodborne disease burdens that are much lower than the true values. Most of the burden posed by foodborne disease in Japan comes from secondary complications. The tools developed by FERG appear useful in estimating disease burdens and setting priorities in the field of food safety.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 147 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 <1%
Unknown 146 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 29 20%
Student > Master 20 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 12%
Researcher 16 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 8%
Other 24 16%
Unknown 28 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 29 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 24 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 8%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 12 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 3%
Other 29 20%
Unknown 36 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 March 2020.
All research outputs
#6,483,704
of 22,992,311 outputs
Outputs from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#1,902
of 4,335 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#77,021
of 268,030 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#20
of 52 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,992,311 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,335 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 268,030 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 52 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.