↓ Skip to main content

Implementation of Family-Based Treatment for Adolescents With Anorexia Nervosa

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Pediatric Healthcare, September 2013
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#13 of 288)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
1 tweeter

Readers on

mendeley
35 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Implementation of Family-Based Treatment for Adolescents With Anorexia Nervosa
Published in
Journal of Pediatric Healthcare, September 2013
DOI 10.1016/j.pedhc.2013.07.012
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hughes, Elizabeth K., Le Grange, Daniel, Court, Andrew, Yeo, Michele, Campbell, Stephanie, Whitelaw, Melissa, Atkins, Linsey, Sawyer, Susan M., Hughes EK, Le Grange D, Court A, Yeo M, Campbell S, Whitelaw M, Atkins L, Sawyer SM, Elizabeth K. Hughes, Daniel Le Grange, Andrew Court, Michele Yeo, Stephanie Campbell, Melissa Whitelaw, Linsey Atkins, Susan M. Sawyer

Abstract

Although the implementation of new treatment models can be a challenging process for health care services, the outcomes can be greatly beneficial to patients and service providers. This article describes the process of change experienced within our multidisciplinary specialist eating disorder service when we implemented a new evidence-based model of care focusing on outpatient family-based treatment (FBT). Clinical outcomes were positive, including a 56% decrease in admissions, a 75% decrease in readmissions, and a 51% decrease in total bed days. Of families referred to FBT, 83% completed treatment and 97% of completers achieved >90% of their expected body weight. Despite these gains, many challenges were experienced, including misgivings about the suitability of FBT and difficulties in adhering to changes in professional roles. We describe these challenges, describe how they were overcome, and review factors perceived to be critical to the program's success, including integration of medical and mental health services, communication, and training.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 3%
Israel 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Canada 1 3%
Unknown 31 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 26%
Student > Bachelor 7 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 17%
Researcher 3 9%
Other 2 6%
Other 8 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 17 49%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 23%
Arts and Humanities 2 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Social Sciences 2 6%
Other 4 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 March 2017.
All research outputs
#908,719
of 8,302,052 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Pediatric Healthcare
#13
of 288 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,752
of 179,301 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Pediatric Healthcare
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,302,052 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 288 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 179,301 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them