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Interferon beta-1a-induced depression and suicidal ideation in multiple sclerosis

Overview of attention for article published in Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria, October 2002
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Title
Interferon beta-1a-induced depression and suicidal ideation in multiple sclerosis
Published in
Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria, October 2002
DOI 10.1590/s0004-282x2002000500007
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marco Aurélio Lana-Peixoto, Antônio Lúcio Teixeira, Vitor Geraldi Haase

Abstract

Depression and suicide have been reported in association with multiple sclerosis (MS). Some studies show that interferon beta may increase the depression rate. We report a case of depression and suicidal ideation in coincidence with the start of increased doses of interferon beta-1a and their complete reversal following the drug withdrawal. The patient was a 21-year-old man with MS and no past history of affective disorders who was given interferon beta-1a in the dose of 11 microgram three times per week. As a new relapse occurred the dose of interferon beta-1a was increased to 22 microgram three times a week. The patient then observed increased worry, irritability and a sense of discouragement as well as recurring suicidal thoughts. His mood was rapidly restored following interferon beta-1a withdrawal. This case suggests that patients with MS may develop depression and suicidal thoughts when treated with high doses of interferon beta-1a.

Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 44 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 24%
Student > Master 5 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 9%
Student > Bachelor 3 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 7%
Other 10 22%
Unknown 9 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 38%
Neuroscience 5 11%
Psychology 3 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 4%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 3 7%
Unknown 14 31%