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Sewage pollution in urban stormwater runoff as evident from the widespread presence of multiple microbial and chemical source tracking markers

Overview of attention for article published in Science of the Total Environment, October 2013
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Title
Sewage pollution in urban stormwater runoff as evident from the widespread presence of multiple microbial and chemical source tracking markers
Published in
Science of the Total Environment, October 2013
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.06.020
Pubmed ID
Authors

J.P.S. Sidhu, W. Ahmed, W. Gernjak, R. Aryal, D. McCarthy, A. Palmer, P. Kolotelo, S. Toze

Abstract

The concurrence of human sewage contamination in urban stormwater runoff (n=23) from six urban catchments across Australia was assessed by using both microbial source tracking (MST) and chemical source tracking (CST) markers. Out of 23 stormwater samples human adenovirus (HAv), human polyomavirus (HPv) and the sewage-associated markers; Methanobrevibacter smithii nifH and Bacteroides HF183 were detected in 91%, 56%, 43% and 96% of samples, respectively. Similarly, CST markers paracetamol (87%), salicylic acid (78%) acesulfame (96%) and caffeine (91%) were frequently detected. Twenty one samples (91%) were positive for six to eight sewage related MST and CST markers and remaining two samples were positive for five and four markers, respectively. A very good consensus (>91%) observed between the concurrence of the HF183, HAv, acesulfame and caffeine suggests good predictability of the presence of HAv in samples positive for one of the three markers. High prevalence of HAv (91%) also suggests that other enteric viruses may also be present in the stormwater samples which may pose significant health risks. This study underscores the benefits of employing a set of MST and CST markers which could include monitoring for HF183, adenovirus, caffeine and paracetamol to accurately detect human sewage contamination along with credible information on the presence of human enteric viruses, which could be used for more reliable public health risk assessments. Based on the results obtained in this study, it is recommended that some degree of treatment of captured stormwater would be required if it were to be used for non-potable purposes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 120 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 2%
Mexico 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Unknown 113 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 20%
Student > Master 23 19%
Researcher 19 16%
Student > Bachelor 15 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 7%
Other 31 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 39 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 23 19%
Unspecified 20 17%
Engineering 18 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 4%
Other 15 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 April 2014.
All research outputs
#9,656,930
of 12,074,466 outputs
Outputs from Science of the Total Environment
#6,179
of 8,112 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#120,160
of 178,790 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science of the Total Environment
#36
of 60 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,074,466 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 8,112 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 178,790 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 60 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.