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Human dental pulp pluripotent-like stem cells promote wound healing and muscle regeneration

Overview of attention for article published in Stem Cell Research & Therapy, July 2017
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Readers on

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37 Mendeley
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Title
Human dental pulp pluripotent-like stem cells promote wound healing and muscle regeneration
Published in
Stem Cell Research & Therapy, July 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13287-017-0621-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ester Martínez-Sarrà, Sheyla Montori, Carlos Gil-Recio, Raquel Núñez-Toldrà, Domiziana Costamagna, Alessio Rotini, Maher Atari, Aernout Luttun, Maurilio Sampaolesi

Abstract

Dental pulp represents an easily accessible autologous source of adult stem cells. A subset of these cells, named dental pulp pluripotent-like stem cells (DPPSC), shows high plasticity and can undergo multiple population doublings, making DPPSC an appealing tool for tissue repair or maintenance. DPPSC were harvested from the dental pulp of third molars extracted from young patients. Growth factors released by DPPSC were analysed using antibody arrays. Cells were cultured in specific differentiation media and their endothelial, smooth and skeletal muscle differentiation potential was evaluated. The therapeutic potential of DPPSC was tested in a wound healing mouse model and in two genetic mouse models of muscular dystrophy (Scid/mdx and Sgcb-null Rag2-null γc-null). DPPSC secreted several growth factors involved in angiogenesis and extracellular matrix deposition and improved vascularisation in all three murine models. Moreover, DPPSC stimulated re-epithelialisation and ameliorated collagen deposition and organisation in healing wounds. In dystrophic mice, DPPSC engrafted in the skeletal muscle of both dystrophic murine models and showed integration in muscular fibres and vessels. In addition, DPPSC treatment resulted in reduced fibrosis and collagen content, larger cross-sectional area of type II fast-glycolytic fibres and infiltration of higher numbers of proangiogenic CD206(+) macrophages. Overall, DPPSC represent a potential source of stem cells to enhance the wound healing process and slow down dystrophic muscle degeneration.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 37 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 37 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 19%
Researcher 3 8%
Student > Master 3 8%
Student > Postgraduate 2 5%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 8 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 41%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 3 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 10 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 April 2018.
All research outputs
#4,503,988
of 15,406,158 outputs
Outputs from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#417
of 1,434 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#91,759
of 270,828 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Stem Cell Research & Therapy
#1
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,406,158 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,434 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,828 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.