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Prevention of: self harm in British South Asian women: study protocol of an exploratory RCT of culturally adapted manual assisted Problem Solving Training (C- MAP)

Overview of attention for article published in Trials, June 2011
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1 tweeter

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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112 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Prevention of: self harm in British South Asian women: study protocol of an exploratory RCT of culturally adapted manual assisted Problem Solving Training (C- MAP)
Published in
Trials, June 2011
DOI 10.1186/1745-6215-12-159
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nusrat Husain, Nasim Chaudhry, Steevart V Durairaj, Imran Chaudhry, Sarah Khan, Meher Husain, Diwaker Nagaraj, Farooq Naeem, Waquas Waheed

Abstract

Suicide is a major public health problem worldwide. In the UK suicide is the second most common cause of death in people aged 15-24 years. Self harm is one of the commonest reasons for medical admission in the UK. In the year following a suicide attempt the risk of a repeat attempt or death by suicide may be up to 100 times greater than in people who have never attempted suicide. Research evidence shows increased risk of suicide and attempted suicide among British South Asian women. There are concerns about the current service provision and its appropriateness for this community due to the low numbers that get involved with the services. Both problem solving and interpersonal forms of psychotherapy are beneficial in the treatment of patients who self harm and could potentially be helpful in this ethnic group.The paper describes the trial protocol of adapting and evaluating a culturally appropriate psychological treatment for the adult British South Asian women who self harm.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 112 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Unknown 109 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 18%
Student > Master 16 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 12%
Student > Bachelor 12 11%
Researcher 12 11%
Other 19 17%
Unknown 20 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 34 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 23 21%
Social Sciences 9 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 3%
Other 11 10%
Unknown 27 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 April 2014.
All research outputs
#2,981,285
of 6,323,466 outputs
Outputs from Trials
#1,190
of 1,858 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#67,313
of 134,016 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Trials
#63
of 107 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,323,466 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,858 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.3. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 134,016 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 107 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.