↓ Skip to main content

Chronic, wireless recordings of large-scale brain activity in freely moving rhesus monkeys

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Methods, April 2014
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Citations

dimensions_citation
221 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
370 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Chronic, wireless recordings of large-scale brain activity in freely moving rhesus monkeys
Published in
Nature Methods, April 2014
DOI 10.1038/nmeth.2936
Pubmed ID
Authors

David A Schwarz, Mikhail A Lebedev, Timothy L Hanson, Dragan F Dimitrov, Gary Lehew, Jim Meloy, Sankaranarayani Rajangam, Vivek Subramanian, Peter J Ifft, Zheng Li, Arjun Ramakrishnan, Andrew Tate, Katie Z Zhuang, Miguel A L Nicolelis

Abstract

Advances in techniques for recording large-scale brain activity contribute to both the elucidation of neurophysiological principles and the development of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs). Here we describe a neurophysiological paradigm for performing tethered and wireless large-scale recordings based on movable volumetric three-dimensional (3D) multielectrode implants. This approach allowed us to isolate up to 1,800 neurons (units) per animal and simultaneously record the extracellular activity of close to 500 cortical neurons, distributed across multiple cortical areas, in freely behaving rhesus monkeys. The method is expandable, in principle, to thousands of simultaneously recorded channels. It also allows increased recording longevity (5 consecutive years) and recording of a broad range of behaviors, such as social interactions, and BMI paradigms in freely moving primates. We propose that wireless large-scale recordings could have a profound impact on basic primate neurophysiology research while providing a framework for the development and testing of clinically relevant neuroprostheses.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 156 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 370 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 8 2%
Brazil 4 1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Germany 2 <1%
China 2 <1%
Hong Kong 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 349 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 113 31%
Researcher 76 21%
Student > Master 42 11%
Student > Bachelor 23 6%
Professor 21 6%
Other 61 16%
Unknown 34 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 102 28%
Neuroscience 80 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 76 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 4%
Computer Science 13 4%
Other 32 9%
Unknown 54 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 170. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 May 2021.
All research outputs
#135,765
of 17,930,534 outputs
Outputs from Nature Methods
#125
of 4,392 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,426
of 198,557 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Methods
#2
of 105 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,930,534 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,392 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 30.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 198,557 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 105 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.