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Young blood reverses age-related impairments in cognitive function and synaptic plasticity in mice

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Medicine, May 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#11 of 6,653)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

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1109 Mendeley
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3 CiteULike
Title
Young blood reverses age-related impairments in cognitive function and synaptic plasticity in mice
Published in
Nature Medicine, May 2014
DOI 10.1038/nm.3569
Pubmed ID
Authors

Saul A Villeda, Kristopher E Plambeck, Jinte Middeldorp, Joseph M Castellano, Kira I Mosher, Jian Luo, Lucas K Smith, Gregor Bieri, Karin Lin, Daniela Berdnik, Rafael Wabl, Joe Udeochu, Elizabeth G Wheatley, Bende Zou, Danielle A Simmons, Xinmin S Xie, Frank M Longo, Tony Wyss-Coray

Abstract

As human lifespan increases, a greater fraction of the population is suffering from age-related cognitive impairments, making it important to elucidate a means to combat the effects of aging. Here we report that exposure of an aged animal to young blood can counteract and reverse pre-existing effects of brain aging at the molecular, structural, functional and cognitive level. Genome-wide microarray analysis of heterochronic parabionts--in which circulatory systems of young and aged animals are connected--identified synaptic plasticity-related transcriptional changes in the hippocampus of aged mice. Dendritic spine density of mature neurons increased and synaptic plasticity improved in the hippocampus of aged heterochronic parabionts. At the cognitive level, systemic administration of young blood plasma into aged mice improved age-related cognitive impairments in both contextual fear conditioning and spatial learning and memory. Structural and cognitive enhancements elicited by exposure to young blood are mediated, in part, by activation of the cyclic AMP response element binding protein (Creb) in the aged hippocampus. Our data indicate that exposure of aged mice to young blood late in life is capable of rejuvenating synaptic plasticity and improving cognitive function.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1,109 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 31 3%
United Kingdom 8 <1%
Spain 7 <1%
Japan 7 <1%
Brazil 5 <1%
Germany 4 <1%
China 4 <1%
Portugal 3 <1%
Switzerland 3 <1%
Other 21 2%
Unknown 1016 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 269 24%
Researcher 262 24%
Student > Bachelor 143 13%
Student > Master 112 10%
Unspecified 68 6%
Other 255 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 435 39%
Medicine and Dentistry 155 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 150 14%
Neuroscience 114 10%
Unspecified 97 9%
Other 158 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1595. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 September 2019.
All research outputs
#1,365
of 13,536,671 outputs
Outputs from Nature Medicine
#11
of 6,653 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#17
of 189,256 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Medicine
#1
of 102 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,536,671 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,653 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 35.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 189,256 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 102 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.