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Time to address gender discrimination and inequality in the health workforce

Overview of attention for article published in Human Resources for Health, May 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#22 of 690)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
46 tweeters
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
37 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
139 Mendeley
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Title
Time to address gender discrimination and inequality in the health workforce
Published in
Human Resources for Health, May 2014
DOI 10.1186/1478-4491-12-25
Pubmed ID
Authors

Constance Newman

Abstract

Gender is a key factor operating in the health workforce. Recent research evidence points to systemic gender discrimination and inequalities in health pre-service and in-service education and employment systems. Human resources for health (HRH) leaders' and researchers' lack of concerted attention to these inequalities is striking, given the recognition of other forms of discrimination in international labour rights and employment law discourse. If not acted upon, gender discrimination and inequalities result in systems inefficiencies that impede the development of the robust workforces needed to respond to today's critical health care needs.This commentary makes the case that there is a clear need for sex- and age-disaggregated and qualitative data to more precisely illuminate gender-related trends and dynamics in the health workforce. Because of their importance for measurement, the paper also presents definitions and examples of sex or gender discrimination and offers specific case examples.At a broader level, the commentary argues that gender equality should be an HRH research, leadership, and governance priority, where the aim is to strengthen health pre-service and continuing professional education and employment systems to achieve better health systems outcomes, including better health coverage. Good HRH leadership, governance, and management involve recognizing the diversity of health workforces, acknowledging gender constraints and opportunities, eliminating gender discrimination and equalizing opportunity, making health systems responsive to life course events, and protecting health workers' labour rights at all levels. A number of global, national and institution-level actions are proposed to move the gender equality and HRH agendas forward.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 46 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 139 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 2%
South Africa 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Unknown 133 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 40 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 17%
Student > Bachelor 19 14%
Researcher 13 9%
Unspecified 10 7%
Other 34 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 42 30%
Social Sciences 27 19%
Nursing and Health Professions 20 14%
Business, Management and Accounting 13 9%
Unspecified 12 9%
Other 25 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 34. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 March 2018.
All research outputs
#450,096
of 12,913,758 outputs
Outputs from Human Resources for Health
#22
of 690 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,100
of 189,744 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Human Resources for Health
#1
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,913,758 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 690 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 189,744 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.