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Towards the centralization of digestive oncologic surgery: changes in activity, techniques and outcome

Overview of attention for article published in Revista Española de Enfermedades Digestivas, January 2017
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1 tweeter

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Title
Towards the centralization of digestive oncologic surgery: changes in activity, techniques and outcome
Published in
Revista Española de Enfermedades Digestivas, January 2017
DOI 10.17235/reed.2017.4710/2016
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cristian Tebé, Roger Pla, Josep Alfons Espinàs, Julieta Corral, Elisa Puigdomenech, Josep Maria Borràs, Joan M. V. Pons, Mireia Espallargues

Abstract

The objective of the present study was to examine changes in the activity, surgical techniques and results from the process of centralization of complex digestive oncologic surgery in 2005-2012 as compared to 1996-2000. A retrospective cohort study employing the minimum basic data set of hospital discharge (MBDSHD 1996-2012) from public centers in Catalonia (Spain) was performed. The population consisted of individuals aged > 18 who underwent digestive oncologic surgery (esophagus, pancreas, liver, stomach or rectum). Medical centers were divided into low, medium, and high-volume centers (≤ 5, 6-10, and > 10 interventions/year, respectively). The tendency Chi-squared test was used to assess the centralization of patients in high-volume centers and hospital mortality evolution during the study period. Logistic regression was performed to assess the relationship between volume and outcome. A centralization of complex oncologic digestive surgery between 10% (liver) and 46% (esophagus) was obtained by means of a reduction in the number of hospitals that perform these interventions and a significant rise in the number of patients operated in high-volume centers (all types p ≤ 0.0001, except for esophagus). A significant decrease in mortality was observed, especially in esophagus (from 15% in 1996/2000 to 7% in 2009/12, p = 0.003) and pancreas (from 12% in 1996/2000 to 6% in 2009/12, p trend < 0.0001). A centralization of oncologic digestive surgery in high-volume centers and a reduction of hospital mortality in Catalonia were reported among esophageal and pancreatic cancers. However, no significant changes were found for others cancer types.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor > Associate Professor 1 14%
Unknown 6 86%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 1 14%
Unknown 6 86%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 August 2017.
All research outputs
#10,244,129
of 11,547,113 outputs
Outputs from Revista Española de Enfermedades Digestivas
#213
of 305 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#222,885
of 263,989 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Revista Española de Enfermedades Digestivas
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,547,113 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 305 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,989 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them