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Joint spatial modelling of disease risk using multiple sources: an application on HIV prevalence from antenatal sentinel and demographic and health surveys in Namibia

Overview of attention for article published in Global Health Research and Policy, August 2017
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1 tweeter

Citations

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2 Dimensions

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13 Mendeley
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Title
Joint spatial modelling of disease risk using multiple sources: an application on HIV prevalence from antenatal sentinel and demographic and health surveys in Namibia
Published in
Global Health Research and Policy, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s41256-017-0041-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

D. Ntirampeba, I. Neema, L. N. Kazembe

Abstract

In disease mapping field, researchers often encounter data from multiple sources. Such data are fraught with challenges such as lack of a representative sample, often incomplete and most of which may have measurement errors, and may be spatially and temporally misaligned. This paper presents a joint model in the effort to deal with the sampling bias and misalignment. A joint (bivariate) spatial model was applied to estimate HIV prevalence using two sources: 2014 National HIV Sentinel survey (NHSS) among pregnant women aged 15-49 years attending antenatal care (ANC) and the 2013 Namibia Demographic and Health Surveys (NDHS). Findings revealed that health districts and constituencies in the northern part of Namibia were found to be highly associated with HIV infection. Also, the study showed that place of residence, gender, gravida, marital status, number of kids dead, wealth index, education, and condom use were significantly associated with HIV infection in Namibia. This study had shown determinants of HIV infection in Namibia and had revealed areas at high risk through HIV prevalence mapping. Moreover, a joint modelling approach was used in order to deal with spatially misaligned data. Finally, it was shown that prediction of HIV prevalence using the NDHS data source can be enhanced by jointly modelling other HIV data such as NHSS data. These findings would help Namibia to tailor national intervention strategies for specific regions and groups of population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 3 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 23%
Student > Master 2 15%
Researcher 2 15%
Student > Postgraduate 1 8%
Other 2 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 4 31%
Social Sciences 2 15%
Mathematics 2 15%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 8%
Other 3 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 August 2017.
All research outputs
#7,197,069
of 11,553,067 outputs
Outputs from Global Health Research and Policy
#39
of 51 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#152,149
of 265,210 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Health Research and Policy
#6
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,553,067 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 51 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,210 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.