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A novel experience-based internet intervention for smoking cessation: feasibility randomised controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, November 2016
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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72 Mendeley
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Title
A novel experience-based internet intervention for smoking cessation: feasibility randomised controlled trial
Published in
BMC Public Health, November 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3821-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

John Powell, Nikki Newhouse, Angela Martin, Sena Jawad, Ly-Mee Yu, Mina Davoudianfar, Louise Locock, Sue Ziebland

Abstract

The internet is frequently used to share experiences of health and illness, but this phenomenon has not been harnessed as an intervention to achieve health behaviour change. The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of a randomised trial assessing the effects of a novel, experience-based website as a smoking cessation intervention. The secondary aim was to measure the potential impact on smoking behaviour of both the intervention and a comparator website. A feasibility randomised controlled single-blind trial assessed a novel, experience-based website containing personal accounts of quitting smoking as a cessation intervention, and a comparator website providing factual information. Feasibility measures including recruitment, and usage of the interventions were recorded, and the following participant-reported outcomes were also measured: Smoking Abstinence Self-Efficacy Questionnaire, the single-item Motivation to Stop Scale, self-reported abstinence, quit attempts and health status outcomes. Eligible smokers from two English regions were entered into the trial and given access to their allocated website for two weeks. Eighty-seven smokers were randomised, 65 completed follow-up (75 %). Median usage was 15 min for the intervention, and 5 min for the comparator (range 0.5-213 min). Median logins for both sites was 2 (range 1-20). All participant-reported outcomes were similar between groups. It was technically feasible to deliver a novel intervention harnessing the online sharing of personal experiences as a tool for smoking cessation, but recruitment was slow and actual use was relatively low, with attrition from the trial. Future work needs to maximize engagement and to understand how best to assess the value of such interventions in everyday use, rather than as an isolated 'dose of information'. ISRCTN29549695 DOI 10.1186/ISRCTN29549695 . Registered 17/05/2013.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 72 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 72 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 14%
Researcher 9 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 13%
Student > Bachelor 8 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 10%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 19 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 15 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 10%
Social Sciences 5 7%
Computer Science 3 4%
Other 9 13%
Unknown 20 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 December 2019.
All research outputs
#14,401,707
of 21,510,091 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#10,620
of 13,957 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#177,180
of 289,324 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#6
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,510,091 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,957 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.7. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 289,324 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 3 of them.