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Optimal esophageal balloon volume for accurate estimation of pleural pressure at end-expiration and end-inspiration: an in vitro bench experiment

Overview of attention for article published in Intensive Care Medicine Experimental, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#45 of 200)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (67th percentile)

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6 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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2 Dimensions

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10 Mendeley
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Title
Optimal esophageal balloon volume for accurate estimation of pleural pressure at end-expiration and end-inspiration: an in vitro bench experiment
Published in
Intensive Care Medicine Experimental, August 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40635-017-0148-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yan-Lin Yang, Xuan He, Xiu-Mei Sun, Han Chen, Zhong-Hua Shi, Ming Xu, Guang-Qiang Chen, Jian-Xin Zhou, Yan-Lin Yang, Xuan He, Xiu-Mei Sun, Han Chen, Zhong-Hua Shi, Ming Xu, Guang-Qiang Chen, Jian-Xin Zhou

Abstract

Esophageal pressure, used as a surrogate for pleural pressure, is commonly measured by air-filled balloon, and the accuracy of measurement depends on the proper balloon volume. It has been found that larger filling volume is required at higher surrounding pressure. In the present study, we determined the balloon pressure-volume relationship in a bench model simulating the pleural cavity during controlled ventilation. The aim was to confirm whether an optimal balloon volume range existed that could provide accurate measurement at both end-expiration and end-inspiration. We investigated three esophageal balloons with different dimensions and materials: Cooper, SmartCath-G, and Microtek catheters. The balloon was introduced into a glass chamber simulating the pleural cavity and volume-controlled ventilation was initiated. The ventilator was set to obtain respective chamber pressures of 5 and 20 cmH2O during end-expiratory and end-inspiratory occlusion. Balloon was progressively inflated, and balloon pressure and chamber pressure were measured. Balloon transmural pressure was defined as the difference between balloon and chamber pressure. The balloon pressure-volume curve was fitted by sigmoid regression, and the minimal and maximal balloon volume accurately reflecting the surrounding pressure was estimated using the lower and upper inflection point of the fitted sigmoid curve. Balloon volumes at end-expiratory and end-inspiratory occlusion were explored, and the balloon volume range that provided accurate measurement at both phases was defined as the optimal filling volume. Sigmoid regression of the balloon pressure-volume curve was justified by the dimensionless variable fitting and residual distribution analysis. All balloon transmural pressures were within ±1.0 cmH2O at the minimal and maximal balloon volumes. The minimal and maximal balloon volumes during end-inspiratory occlusion were significantly larger than those during end-expiratory occlusion, except for the minimal volume in Cooper catheter. Mean (±standard deviation) of optimal filling volume both suitable for end-expiratory and end-inspiratory measurement ranged 0.7 ± 0.0 to 1.7 ± 0.2 ml in Cooper, 1.9 ± 0.2 to 3.6 ± 0.3 ml in SmartCath-G, and 2.2 ± 0.2 to 4.6 ± 0.1 ml in Microtek catheter. In each of the tested balloon, an optimal filling volume range was found that provided accurate measurement during both end-expiratory and end-inspiratory occlusion.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 3 30%
Researcher 2 20%
Student > Master 2 20%
Lecturer 1 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 10%
Other 1 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 40%
Engineering 2 20%
Computer Science 1 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 10%
Unspecified 1 10%
Other 1 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 August 2017.
All research outputs
#3,016,899
of 11,586,569 outputs
Outputs from Intensive Care Medicine Experimental
#45
of 200 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#84,989
of 265,717 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Intensive Care Medicine Experimental
#8
of 11 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,586,569 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 73rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 200 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,717 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 11 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.