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Yogurt supplemented with probiotics can protect the healthy elderly from respiratory infections: A randomized controlled open-label trial

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Interventions in Aging, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 news outlets
twitter
11 X users
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
1 YouTube creator

Citations

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83 Dimensions

Readers on

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152 Mendeley
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Title
Yogurt supplemented with probiotics can protect the healthy elderly from respiratory infections: A randomized controlled open-label trial
Published in
Clinical Interventions in Aging, August 2017
DOI 10.2147/cia.s141518
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fangfang Pu, Yue Guo, Ming Li, Hong Zhu, Shijie Wang, Xi Shen, Miao He, Chengyu Huang, Fang He

Abstract

To evaluate whether yogurt supplemented with a probiotic strain could protect middle-aged and elderly people from acute upper respiratory tract infections (URTI) using a randomized, blank-controlled, parallel-group design. Two hundred and five volunteers aged ≥45 years were randomly divided into two groups. The subjects in the intervention group were orally administered 300 mL/d of yogurt supplemented with a probiotic strain, Lactobacillus paracasei N1115 (N1115), 3.6×10(7) CFU/mL for 12 weeks, while those in the control group retained their normal diet without any probiotic supplementation. The primary outcome was the incidence of URTI, and changes in serum protein, immunoglobulins, and the profiles of the T-lymphocyte subsets (total T-cells [CD3(+)], T-helper cells [CD4(+)], and T-cytotoxic-suppressor cells [CD8(+)]) during the intervention were the secondary outcomes. Compared to the control group, the number of persons diagnosed with an acute URTI and the number of URTI events significantly decreased in the intervention group (P=0.038, P=0.030, respectively). The risk of URTI in the intervention group was evaluated as 55% of that in the control group (relative risk =0.55, 95% CI: 0.307-0.969). The change in the percentage of CD3(+) cells in the intervention group was significantly higher than in the control group (P=0.038). However, no significant differences were observed in the total protein, albumin, globulin, and prealbumin levels in both groups (P>0.05). The study suggested that yogurt with selected probiotic strains such as N1115 may reduce the risk of acute upper tract infections in the elderly. The enhancement of the T-cell-mediated natural immune defense might be one of the important underlying mechanisms for probiotics to express their anti-infective effects.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 152 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 152 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 24 16%
Student > Master 21 14%
Researcher 11 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 5%
Other 24 16%
Unknown 56 37%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 23 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 22 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 5%
Social Sciences 4 3%
Other 19 13%
Unknown 61 40%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 26. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 September 2021.
All research outputs
#1,460,841
of 25,382,440 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#151
of 1,968 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,595
of 327,503 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Interventions in Aging
#3
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,382,440 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,968 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 327,503 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.