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Increased sporadic extremes decrease the intraseasonal variability in the Indian summer monsoon rainfall

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, August 2017
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Title
Increased sporadic extremes decrease the intraseasonal variability in the Indian summer monsoon rainfall
Published in
Scientific Reports, August 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-07529-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nirupam Karmakar, Arindam Chakraborty, Ravi S. Nanjundiah

Abstract

The Indian summer monsoon (ISM) shows quasi-rhythmic intraseasonal oscillations (ISO) manifested as alternate 'active' phases of copious rainfall and quiescent phases of 'break'. Within these periodic phases, the daily rainfall shows large variability and exhibits spatiotemporally sporadic extreme rainfall events. The recent decades have witnessed a significant increase in the number of these extreme rainfall events, especially in the quiescent phases. This increase is accompanied by a decreasing trend in the mean monsoon rainfall and a weakening variance of its low-frequency ISO (LF-ISO) cycle. However, any physical link between this apparent paradox of increased extreme rainfall events and weakened slower-time-scale components is not yet reported. Here, using observations and numerical model simulations, we show that the occurrence of extreme rainfall events, primarily in the break phase of an LF-ISO cycle, reduce the intensity of the following active phase by stabilizing the atmosphere. We found that extreme events in a monsoon break leads to a reduction in the vertical shear of zonal winds and an increase in the static stability of the atmosphere in the following break-to-active transition and active phases. These conditions oppose the initiation and development of an active phase and lessen its intensity. This reduces the LF-ISO intensity and mean ISM rainfall.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 39%
Researcher 5 28%
Unspecified 2 11%
Student > Postgraduate 1 6%
Student > Master 1 6%
Other 2 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 9 50%
Environmental Science 4 22%
Unspecified 2 11%
Engineering 2 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 August 2017.
All research outputs
#10,285,886
of 11,595,461 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#41,534
of 50,535 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#224,081
of 265,312 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#3,598
of 4,394 outputs
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